Articles Tagged with: University of Maryland Medical Center
Accelerating Change through Evidence-Based Design

As a Cornerstone partner of the Center for Health Design, Ballinger advances the mission of improving the quality of healthcare through design of the built environment. Ballinger has been an active participant in the Center’s work, including the Pebble Project, a national research initiative to formalize an evidence-based design process. The goal is to create a ripple effect by documenting peer-reviewed examples of healthcare environments that employ evidence-based design and then assess outcomes.

Ballinger participated in the planning of two Pebble Projects: the University of Maryland Medical Center’s Shock Trauma Critical Care Tower and the Weill Greenberg Ambulatory Care Center at Weill Cornell Medicine. The Weill Greenberg Center was one of the nation’s first Pebble Projects, and research on the design impacts was published in the peer-reviewed Health Environments Research + Design (HERD) Journal.

In line with the mission to share knowledge, Ballinger leaders have also presented lectures and webinars at learning sessions organized by Center. We are proud to contribute to the Center’s ultimate goal of improving patient outcomes.

Read more on Ballinger’s partnership with the Center for Health Design

Ballinger Helps Academic Medical Centers Move Beyond State-of-the-Art to Anticipate the Road Ahead

In the Sept-Oct 2015 issue of Medical Construction and Design, Ballinger Principal Louis Meilink Jr., AIA, ACHA, ACHE, discusses the future of Academic Medical Centers (AMC).  AMCs account for 6 percent of care providers, but contribute 20 percent of all hospital care and 40 percent of the uncompensated charity care in the US.  With a disproportionately large market share, AMCs are the first to feel the impact of regulatory and market pressures.  To neutralize pressures without sacrificing mission or quality of care, AMCs must identify strategies to ensure regenerative institutional growth.  Forward-thinking planning and design can contribute directly to the agility of these institutions.

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