Articles Tagged with: NewYork-Presbyterian

Welcome addition

The NewYork-Presbyterian Alexandra Cohen Hospital for Women and Newborns was featured in the August issue of Healthcare Design Magazine. Writer Joann Plockova described its inviting environments for mothers and families.   

Excerpted from Healthcare Design:

As a whole, the NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch Center in Manhattan houses three distinct programs: ambulatory care; an integrative health and wellbeing center; and the newest addition, a hospital for women and newborns. Largely constructed following the opening of the first two programs in 2018, the Alexandra Cohen Hospital for Women and Newborns, which opened in August 2020, offers comprehensive care for mother and infant—before, during, and after birth, including specialized prenatal care and neonatal intensive care. However, it wasn’t a planned tenant from the beginning. Rather, the women’s hospital was considered along with the idea of additional ambulatory care to fill the building’s top six floors of shell space. But when neighboring NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center’s Greenberg Pavilion sought to expand capacity for its women and newborn services, the organization looked to those Koch Center floors as a convenient and natural fit for a new women’s hospital. “Relocating to the building across the street allows us to grow the service and provide a physical environment that matches the exceptional patient care,” says Hillary Shaw, vice president of the Alexander Cohen Hospital for Woman and Newborns and the David H. Koch Center in New York.

COMPREHENSIVE SERVICES

Spanning 246,500 gross square feet, the new Alexandra Cohen Hospital for Women and Newborns includes ultrasound and antepartum outpatient services on the 12th floor; labor and delivery on the 14th floor; a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) with MRI and an operating room on the 15th floor; and three floors dedicated to inpatient postpartum care on floors 16 to 18. Designed to accommodate 7,000 births per year, the hospital, which nearly triples the organization’s previous space for mother and infant care, includes 75 private antepartum and postpartum rooms (up from 68), 60 newborn intensive care beds (up from 50, and including 42 private units), and 16 labor and delivery rooms (up from 11). Clinical spaces include five C-section operating rooms, 20 triage/prep/recovery rooms, eight private antepartum testing rooms, and 15 ultrasound rooms on the 12th floor.

The project was a collaboration between several firms that delivered the earlier Koch Center projects, including HOK (New York) as project architect and Ballinger (Philadelphia), which served as medical architect and healthcare planner; interior design was by HOK with Ballinger.

Similar to the Koch Center’s existing design, the women’s hospital offers an oasis from the urban environment while addressing the specific needs of its patients and families. “[For mothers and their families] it’s an exciting situation to be in, but quite stressful,” says Sara Ridenour, associate principal at Ballinger. To help address that, the project team crafted a clear path to help patients get from start to finish with ease. “We choreographed the experience for all parties via flow mapping,” says Ridenour. After arriving at the drop-off area—designed as a quiet, internal avenue where patients can avoid the stress of a busy city street—patients are greeted in the main lobby of the Koch Center and directed to dedicated elevators that stop only on floors 12 through 18. Notified that a patient is on the way, a staff member will be waiting upon arrival in the sky lobby, located in the corner on each floor and offering views of the city, to escort the patient to either a prep/recovery room for a scheduled C-section or triage. After giving birth, mothers are then transported to the postpartum unit via dedicated elevators within the hospital.

Another connection between the new hospital and the established Koch Center is the continuation of the onstage/offstage operational flow. The building’s L-shaped floor plate provided a natural split to place offstage services, including the staff corridor, on the inside of the L, while public and patient spaces are on the periphery with access to views of New York and plenty of natural light (with the exception of the 12th floor, where the corridor is on the perimeter).

A focus on patient-centered care, including private patient rooms and family support amenities, was among five “Departmental Visions and Goals for Maternity and NICU” outlined for the project by NewYork-Presbyterian, Shaw says. Every patient room has three zones, including a caregiver zone from the entrance to the bed; a patient zone at the headwall; and a family zone, which is typically against the window. “We were very deliberate in moving to a private model,” she says. “Private rooms allow for greater bonding between the new family unit where the mother, partner, and newborn can bond together in the postpartum or NICU rooms. Partners or parents can sleep over and be more involved with the care of their loved ones.”

Ridenour says private areas for family are prioritized, too. “Sometimes family members need respite, too; and reducing stress and providing comfort for mother, baby, and family is part of the project vision,” she says. For example, every floor has a family lounge, which is centrally located near the entrance for easy access, while on the labor and delivery floor, there’s a partner’s lounge that offers a place for retreat when needed. The NICU floor houses a shower, laundry, and a sibling child life room. The postpartum floors include multipurpose education rooms and a family dining room on the 16th floor where families can have a celebration dinner.

Staff spaces in the core include a layered zone of three adjoined areas including a nurses’ station/administrative area, a large team room/ touchdown area, and a smaller dictation room for physicians in the back. These three connected spaces are encased in glass, which allows staff to have access to natural daylight coming in through the patient rooms. A sliding glass door between the spaces allows the team to open up the rooms for larger meetings. “There are levels of privacy and collaboration that we made as flexible as possible,” says Ridenour. Decentralized nurses’ stations are located between every two rooms throughout the hospital and between every room on the NICU floor.

The NICU patient rooms are arranged to operate as distinct neighborhoods, with 12 rooms on the west side that can be divided into one or two neighborhoods and 38 rooms on the east side, which can be organized into two or three neighborhoods. Each neighborhood has a dedicated entry point to eliminate travel through one neighborhood to get to another. In addition, an offstage corridor is provided for staff and supplies to reduce noise levels in the patient area and minimize conflicts with family flow. “I think one thing that’s really great about our NICU is we brought all of the services to the floor, so we don’t have to transport these critically ill babies except for in very unique circumstances,” says Shaw. “By bringing the MRI and operating room to the floor, we’ve really integrated care into one location for the family.”

SPECIAL DELIVERY

Although some of the communal spaces, like the multipurpose education rooms and the family dining space, have been “sitting vacant for the time being” due to COVID-19, Shaw says, feedback on the hospitality approach has been positive.

Specifically, patients are appreciative of the privacy, large rooms, art program, an abundant light incorporated throughout—insight that confirms the organization’s decision to fill the shell floors with the women’s hospital was the right one. “[It’s] allowed us to offer the very best care for our patients in a bright and nurturing environment that prioritizes comfort, safety, and privacy,” Shaw says.

Patient-Centric Design

The May-June issue of Architectural Products includes a feature on trends in healthcare design. A two-page spread about the NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch Center describes the patient-centric design elements that contribute to a soothing experience, including a consistent materials palette and clear wayfinding.

The project was designed through a collaboration between Ballinger, HOK, and Pei Cobb Freed & Partners.

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DHK Center Wins BD+C Building Team Award

The NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch (DHK) Center, a 734,000 SF ambulatory care center designed through a collaboration between Ballinger, HOK, and Pei Cobb Freed & Partners, received a 2020 Building Team Award from Building Design + Construction.

The national awards program honors building projects for their architectural excellence as well as for successful collaboration between owners, architects, engineers and contractors. A jury of 17 experts selected the DHK Center for silver recognition.

Opened in 2018 on New York City’s Upper East Side, the building was designed to provide patient and family-centered care in a healing environment.

Winners were published in the May/June issue of Building Design + Construction magazine.

David H. Koch Center Achieves LEED Gold

The NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch Center was recently certified LEED Gold by the United States Green Building Council (USGBC). It’s the first project in New York City to earn certification and the first in the state to achieve LEED Gold under the more stringent LEED Healthcare rating system.

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The 734,000 GSF state-of-the-art ambulatory facility was designed via a collaboration between Ballinger, HOK, and Pei Cobb Freed & Partners, with Syska Hennessy Group as MEP engineer. Centered around providing a seamless patient-care experience from beginning to end, the facility is also designed for operational efficiency, future flexibility and sustainability.

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Sustainable strategies include a high-performance building skin, high-efficiency mechanical systems and a green roof covering 30% of the surface. Systems are designed to decrease energy use by 18.7% and water usage by 30%. The distinctive façade consists of triple paned insulated glazing with slatted wood screens, which reduces solar glare, building heat gain, and the need for solar and privacy shading.

NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch Center Wins Award of Merit

New York Presbyterian Hospital, David Koch Center, Location: New York NY, Architect: Pei Cobb Freed & PartnersThe NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch Center was officially honored today with the Healthcare Design (HCD) 2019 Award of Merit. This award, part of the 2019 Healthcare Design Showcase, is the highest honor that a project can receive in the program.

The 734,000 SF world-class ambulatory facility, completed in 2018, was designed through a collaboration between Ballinger, HOK, and Pei Cobb Freed & Partners. The state-of-the-art facility pushes the boundaries of innovation to provide exceptional care and a seamless patient experience for all.

Ballinger Senior Principal Louis A. Meilink, Jr., FAIA, FACHA, ACHE, and Principal Erin Nunes Cooper, AIA, ACHA, LEED AP, along with Scott Rawlings, AIA, FACHA, LEED AP, Director of Healthcare at HOK, accepted the award on behalf of all the team members who contributed to the project.

Link to NYP’s Award Profile on Healthcare Design Magazine’s Website

NYP’s David H. Koch Center named Best Healthcare Project of 2018 by ENR

The New York chapter of Engineering News-Record (ENR) named the David H. Koch Center at NewYork-Presbyterian the Best Healthcare Project of 2018. The 740,000 SF project was a design collaboration between Ballinger, HOK and Pei Cobb Freed & Partners.

ENR’s annual awards program is dedicated to honoring the best construction projects and the companies that designed and built them. NYP’s David H. Koch Center was submitted for the award by construction manager Turner Construction.

Congratulations to the team!

 

NewYork-Presbyterian’s Operating Room of the Future featured in The Wall Street Journal

NewYork-Presbyterian’s David H. Koch Center is home to cutting-edge technology and thoughtful design solutions. Healthcare journalist Laura Landro profiled the evolution of operating rooms for The Wall Street Journal and highlighted the state-of-the-art ORs designed by Ballinger.

The 740,000 SF David H. Koch Center, designed in collaboration with HOK, and Pei Cobb Freed & Partners, opened in April 2018.

Link to article

 

 

NewYork-Presbyterian Opens a World-Class Center for Ambulatory Care

A Seamless Patient Experience, Designed to Reduce Stress and Anxiety, Keeps the Focus on Healing

On April 24, 2018, NewYork-Presbyterian (NYP) celebrated the opening of the David H. Koch Center, a world-class ambulatory care center that combines innovative clinical approaches and cutting-edge technology to provide exceptional care and a seamless patient experience.

The design is a collaboration among Ballinger as Medical Architect, HOK as Architect, and Pei Cobb Freed & Partners as Consulting Architect for building envelope and lobby.

The approximately 740,000-sq.-ft. facility, located at the NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center campus on York Avenue and 68th Street, is home to a wide range of ambulatory care services, including outpatient surgery, interventional radiology, diagnostic imaging and infusion services, as well as an Integrative Health and Wellbeing program that will open in June.

“Our goal in creating the NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch Center was to develop a new vision for what ambulatory care could be by focusing first and foremost on patients’ needs and the delivery of exceptional care,” said Dr. Steven J. Corwin, president and CEO of NewYork-Presbyterian. “Every decision about the design and operation of this building was made with the patient in mind, from the quick and easy check-in to the private prep and recovery rooms, light-filled treatment areas and real-time status updates. This is truly an environment that was designed for healing, and we believe it represents the future of ambulatory care.”

For patients, the NYP David H. Koch Center will serve as a one-stop destination for individualized, coordinated care from diagnosis to treatment. Multidisciplinary teams of physicians from Weill Cornell Medicine, working collaboratively under one roof, will consider each patient holistically, whether they are being treated for digestive diseases, cancer or other conditions, or coming for outpatient surgery, interventional radiology or diagnostic imaging.

Smart technology and smart spaces are central to the design and function of the building to make patient visits as smooth and pleasant as possible. For example, patients can complete their paperwork remotely and securely before their visit, on their mobile phone or online. Upon arrival, they will be offered a personalized “smartband” that provides access to the building and receive information about their visit and step-by-step directions to their room through the NYP app. Each patient’s visit has a clear, planned flow that begins and ends in the same space for patients having a procedure — a private prep and recovery room that serves as “home base” for them and their companions throughout their visit.

Technology is central to delivering exceptional, cutting-edge care. A prime example is the NYP David H. Koch Center’s MRI/PET/Angiography suite, the first of its kind in the world. Combining all of the key imaging technologies used for minimally-invasive procedures, including MRI/PET, fluoroscopy, ultrasound, and rotational CT, it enables clinicians to diagnose, plan, and precisely guide procedures and verify their completeness. The NYP David H. Koch Center features three linear accelerators, including New York’s first MRI-guided linear accelerator for precision radiation treatment of tumors.

Additional clinical features include:

  • 12 operating suites, 6 interventional radiology procedure rooms, and 11 endoscopic procedure rooms, including an operating room dedicated to breast surgery with mammography and ultrasound equipment.
  • Decentralized clinical care with stations directly outside private patient rooms, offering patients easier access to their care team.
  • Radiation oncology services located on the light-filled 4th floor, thanks to the building’s unique engineering. Unlike many institutions, there are no basement treatment areas here.
  • Easy access to discharge instructions, test results and video follow-up appointments with physicians through the NYP app.

Sustainability and Resiliency
The NYP David H. Koch Center is designed to be highly sustainable, from its green roof, which can detain up to six inches of storm water, to its high-performance building envelope. The distinctive “skin” consists of triple-paned insulated glazing with a slatted wood screen, which significantly reduces solar glare, building heat gain, and the need for solar and privacy shading.

The building is also resilient in the case of an extreme weather event or disruption to city power, with heating equipment, air handling units, emergency generators and other key operational equipment located on higher floors above potential flood levels.

Enhanced Care for Patients
The design features a soothing palette of materials including wood and stone. A typical procedure floor has a sky lobby, 12 flexible procedure rooms, and 36 private prep and recovery rooms. Procedure preparation and recovery occur in the same dedicated room, which helps minimize patient movements and provides peace of mind for the patient, family, and care team.

Circulation is clear, with a separation of “on-stage” and “off-stage” flows so patients and families can travel along the light-filled perimeter corridors with clear wayfinding, and staff can move efficiently throughout the building, minimizing disruption to guests.

Infusion and radiation oncology areas – typically located on lower levels – are co-located on the 4th floor of the building. This allows patients and staff access to natural light, an example of the extraordinary accommodations made at the NYP David H. Koch Center to prioritize patient-centered care. The infusion area features a variety of treatment environments ranging from private rooms to warm and inviting community spaces.

NewYork-Presbyterian Alexandra Cohen Hospital for Women and Newborns
Beginning in 2020, the top five-and-a-half floors of the building will become home to the NewYork-Presbyterian Alexandra Cohen Hospital for Women and Newborns, the first of its kind in the tri-state area, offering compassionate, personalized care to pregnant women, newborn babies and their families. The 220,000-square-foot hospital within a hospital will feature 75 private rooms, 16 labor and delivery rooms, five cesarean section operative suites, 20 maternal critical assessment and treatment unit rooms and 15 ultrasound rooms, which will offer state-of-the-art visualization. The neonatal intensive care unit features 60 positions in private rooms, and is set to be the first facility in New York City to have MRI capabilities and an operating room in its neonatal intensive care unit.

 Team
NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch Center
Medical Architect: Ballinger
Architect: HOK
Consulting Architect (building envelope and lobby): Pei Cobb Freed & Partners
Interior Design: Ballinger and HOK
Structural Engineer: Thornton Tomasetti
MEP: Syska Hennesy Group
Construction Manager: Turner Construction Company
Lobby Art: Paqutá (2018) by Beatriz Milhazes

Ballinger projects featured in Building Design + Construction

Three Ballinger projects were featured in a recent article published by Building Design + Construction magazine. In a survey of trends in the design of cancer research and treatment centers, Penn Medicine Lancaster General Health’s Ann B. Barshinger Cancer Institute, NewYork-Presbyterian’s David H. Koch Center, and the MD Anderson Center Oncology In-Patient Unit at Cooper University Hospital were praised for their innovative approaches to cancer care.

Associate Principal and Senior Project Manager Erin Nunes Cooper, AIA, LEED AP, was extensively quoted regarding her expertise in the field. She emphasized Ballinger’s family- and patient-focused design approach, as well as her commitment to creating spaces capable of adapting to new healthcare technologies — all fundamental values to the development of the three named projects.

A photograph of the Ballinger-designed meditation pavilion, overlooking a garden and pond at the Ann B. Barshinger Cancer Institute, accompanied the piece. As noted in the article, Ballinger remains at the forefront of adaptive design solutions for the research and treatment challenges of our time.

Link to Article

Ballinger Applies 3D Printing Technology as a Hands-On Tool for Streamlining Healthcare Design

Three-dimensional printing capabilities are becoming a fixture in Ballinger’s healthcare planning and design process. In an effort to provide clients with the most effective means to collaborate and assess options, Ballinger’s NewYork-Presbyterian Ambulatory Care Center team employed 3D printed model pieces to design 28 procedure rooms. The model pieces were used in interdisciplinary role playing workshops with users during schematic design and design development.

Rather than using 3D print technology for massing models or façade explorations, the ACC team took 3D printing to a new level, creating printed pieces of all the equipment in the procedure rooms; from surgical tables and anesthesia carts to fixed imaging equipment and waste bins. Over 250 moveable 3D printed pieces were made to cover 22 procedure case types.

The team made use of Ballinger’s in-house plastic and powder 3D printers, which allowed them to add to the fleet of pieces on-demand as the client investigated additional case types. In the user group workshops, the presence of model pieces generated excitement and cultivated a heightened level of focus and engagement – as well as fun – amongst the participants. A key advantage of this process was the ability to try various layouts quickly and efficiently, eliminating scenarios that did not work, and honing in on the details of the most promising scenarios. As a result of these sessions, room layouts were solidified early in the design process and a template design was developed for Ambulatory Surgery, Interventional Radiology, and Endoscopy procedure rooms. In a bold move, Interventional Radiology and Endoscopy were designed to be OR-like, including applying clean flow, while improving operational and space efficiency.

Building on the success of the planning process for the Ambulatory Care Center, Ballinger has continued to invest in 3D printing technologies and has applied this strategy on several other projects. Recently Ballinger had the opportunity to bring the models back to NewYork-Presbyterian for a new Women’s Hospital project.