Articles Tagged with: LEED Gold

Kraus Building Awarded LEED Gold

Ballinger’s Kraus Building Renovation project at the University of Michigan was recently certified Gold by the U.S. Green Building Council.

Excerpted from the University of Michigan:

The School of Kinesiology Building renovation and addition project has earned LEED Gold building certification from the U.S. Green Building Council in recognition of sustainability efforts.

The building, originally constructed in 1915 and formerly called the Edward Henry Kraus Building, includes research labs, a vivarium, classrooms, faculty offices and common space.

The renovation and addition include a number of features that will lead to a predicted energy cost savings of 41 percent, as compared with a code-compliant building per 2007 guidelines from the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers.

Energy-saving facets include:

  • New, well-insulated windows and doors at all exterior locations to provide improved thermal performance. The replacement assemblies have been tested in place to ensure minimal air infiltration.
  • A skylight in a new atrium area to bring natural light deep into the building. Advanced lighting controls, such as daylight dimming, also conserve energy.
  • LED lighting with occupancy sensors throughout the building. Historic fixtures at entrances were retrofitted with LED lamps.

The building also features low-flow plumbing fixtures and automatic sensor faucets, which are predicted to reduce water use by 34 percent compared to Michigan Plumbing Code standards. It also boasts close proximity to basic services and bus transportation.

The project included a 62,700-square-foot infill addition, featuring a three-story atrium and the aforementioned skylight. The addition enclosed the building’s courtyard, thereby reducing the climate cost of using new building materials.

LEED, which stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, is the most widely used green building rating system in the world. It recognizes sustainability efforts to create healthy, highly efficient and cost-saving green buildings on one of four levels: Certified, Silver, Gold and Platinum.

The School of Kinesiology Building renovation and addition earned 62 points from the U.S. Green Business Council, out of 110 possible.

Since 2005, when U-M first received “green building” certifications, 18 projects have earned LEED designations. All new U-M buildings and additions with an estimated construction budget greater than $10 million are required to achieve at least LEED Silver certification.

Link to full article

Penn Stemmler Hall Achieves LEED Gold

Stemmler Hall at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine was certified LEED Gold by the U.S. Green Building Council. Ballinger provided architecture, engineering and lab planning services for this transformative renovation in the heart of campus. An important ambition of the project was to help fulfill the aspirations of Penn’s Climate and Sustainability Action Plan.

Ballinger designed a neutral air chilled beam system with dual heat recovery wheels coupled with demand-controlled ventilation. Calculations project a 50% reduction in energy use and significant annual cost savings. Efficient floorplans enable program and research flexibility, resulting in an open and adaptable 21st century magnet facility with 50% more workstations.

In 2019 Green Building United, Philadelphia’s chapter of the USGBC, recognized the project as a finalist for its Groundbreaker Award program.

American University Hall of Science Project Awarded LEED Gold

Ballinger’s Hall of Science at American University in Washington, DC was certified LEED Gold by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC).

The Hall of Science is a state-of-the-art, centralized hub for the biology, chemistry, neuroscience and environmental sciences at American University. The building design is characterized by extensive transparency, putting science and research on display, and linking occupants to newly created gardens in the lush arboretum campus outside.

Sustainable design features include bioswales to capture roof and site stormwater, neutral-air chilled beam mechanical system, and daylight harvesting throughout. The building is served by AU’s campus micro-turbine cogeneration plant, which lowers the building’s carbon footprint.

David H. Koch Center Achieves LEED Gold

The NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch Center was recently certified LEED Gold by the United States Green Building Council (USGBC). It’s the first project in New York City to earn certification and the first in the state to achieve LEED Gold under the more stringent LEED Healthcare rating system.

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The 734,000 GSF state-of-the-art ambulatory facility was designed via a collaboration between Ballinger, HOK, and Pei Cobb Freed & Partners, with Syska Hennessy Group as MEP engineer. Centered around providing a seamless patient-care experience from beginning to end, the facility is also designed for operational efficiency, future flexibility and sustainability.

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Sustainable strategies include a high-performance building skin, high-efficiency mechanical systems and a green roof covering 30% of the surface. Systems are designed to decrease energy use by 18.7% and water usage by 30%. The distinctive façade consists of triple paned insulated glazing with slatted wood screens, which reduces solar glare, building heat gain, and the need for solar and privacy shading.

CHOP Roberts Center awarded LEED Gold

The Roberts Center for Pediatric Research at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) was certified LEED Gold by the United States Green Building Council (USGBC). Sustainable features include stormwater management throughout the site, energy-efficient lighting, chilled beams, regenerative drive elevators, and an Indigo bike-share station. A landscaped public plaza provides a place for respite for CHOP employees as well as community members.

Margaret A. Cargill Natural Sciences and Health Building at Berea College Awarded LEED Gold

Natual & Health Sciences Building The recently completed Margaret A. Cargill Natural Sciences and Health Building (MAC) at Berea College was awarded LEED Gold certification and Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) Project Certification. Ballinger served as architect and engineer for the highly-visible 125,000 SF new building, designed to prepare students for careers at the intersection of science and health.

Energy consumption in a laboratory is driven by outdoor air requirements, the heating and cooling to condition this air, and high internal heat gains from laboratory equipment. Ballinger designed sustainable systems within MAC to mitigate the energy impact of these drivers. Enthalpy and sensible energy recovery wheels deliver neutral temperature ventilation air. The design decouples ventilation requirements from heating and cooling demands. Active chilled beams provide sensible cooling throughout the building.

The project also received the Forest Stewardship Council’s Full Project Certification. This certification requires a full audit of all wood products used in construction and verification that they were sourced with ecological responsibility. Low-tech horse-logging techniques were used to sustainably harvest timber from ash trees at risk by the invasive Emerald Ash Borer beetle. Once the timber was milled, Berea College Woodcraft students designed and constructed the native-ash panels that now sheathe the building’s atrium. Berea is now home to five of eight FSC certified projects in the US and one of only 85 worldwide.

Design for Penn’s “Evans Building Centennial Renaissance” Achieves LEED Gold

In May 2018, the University of Pennsylvania’s recently renovated Evans Building was awarded LEED Gold by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). The building is home to Penn’s School of Dental Medicine and the Leon Levy Dental Medicine Library.

Anticipating the structure’s 100th anniversary in 2015, Penn commissioned Ballinger to program, plan, and redesign the historic building for their “Evans Building Centennial Renaissance” initiative. With the goal of bringing the School of Dental Medicine into the 21st century, the space was re-envisioned to optimize patient care, expand academic and clinical spaces, and improve circulation flows.

Ballinger’s designers, engineers, and historic preservation team were tasked with preserving the building’s historic character while also modernizing infrastructure and systems to improve occupant comfort and operating efficiencies. USGBC awarded the LEED Gold certification based on the building’s optimized energy performance, green power, enhanced commissioning, reduced water usage, and innovative design.

Penn Medicine Chester County Hospital Expansion Steel Topping Out

A “topping out” ceremony was hosted on Tuesday for the expansion project at Chester County Hospital. The event marks the completion of steel work for the largest expansion in the hospital’s 125-year history.

A topping out ceremony is one of the oldest customs in the construction industry. It is celebrated when the last beam is placed at the top of a new building and traditionally involves placing an evergreen tree and U.S. flag on top of the structure, along with the final piece of steel. Chester County Hospital’s final beam was signed by hundreds of employees, leadership, and tradesmen.

Ballinger provided architecture and interior design services for the building, which, when completed, will feature a new main entry, procedural platform, emergency department, parking garage, green roof, and bed tower. The 250,000 SF expansion is scheduled for completion in 2019.­

Adelphi University Celebrates Opening of its Ballinger-Designed 100,000 SF Nexus Building with a Ribbon Cutting Ceremony

Garden City, New York  

Adelphi University commemorated the opening of its largest campus project, the $76 million new Nexus Building with a ribbon cutting ceremony and tours of the facility.

The Nexus Building, which opened in the fall of 2016, is the Ballinger-designed home of Adelphi University’s highly-regarded College of Nursing and Public Health, the Center for Health Innovation, and a hub for core student services. Nexus is also a welcoming space for prospective families who visit Adelphi’s admissions office and alumni who access the advancement office. 

The 100,000 SF building is a visual representation of Adelphi’s commitment to community, collaboration and academic excellence.  Adelphi University’s Dr. Christine M. Riordan, President and Ronald Lee, Chairman of the Board of Trustees spoke at the ribbon cutting along with several student representatives.  Ballinger’s design team was represented at the event by Principal Designer Terry Steelman, Senior Designer Zak Whiting, and Senior Project Architect Sean Harrington.

Nexus’ airy, open floor plan promotes student interaction—both academic and social.  A three-story glazed commons serves as the central connector for the varied programmatic elements.  Flooded with natural light, the space extends the existing campus pedestrian passageways through and alongside the building, weaving it into the campus fabric and celebrating its prominence as a campus destination.

The Adelphi campus is an arboretum, so landscape and environmental sensitivity were design drivers. This state-of-the-art LEED Gold-designed building, features a green roof and terrace, energy efficient systems, clinical simulation, research and informatics labs, and over 15 contemporary learning spaces adding over 11,400 SF of classrooms and over 21,000 SF for Adelphi’s health-related programs.

The Nexus Building broke ground in 2013, and has received the following awards:

  • AIA Silver Award, Unbuilt, Philadelphia Chapter, 2014
  • AIA Merit Award, Unbuilt, Pennsylvania Chapter, 2013

Read more about the Adelphi University Nexus Building here.

University of Michigan Taubman Health Sciences Library Achieves LEED Gold

On February 22, 2016, the University of Michigan’s A. Alfred Taubman Health Sciences Library achieved LEED Gold Status.

The new library contains simulation suites, classrooms, collaboration labs, and study areas. Ballinger led the Medical School through a comprehensive project formation and benchmarking effort to determine the most effective design for a 21st century library space. The resulting 137,000-square-foot addition and renovation transformed the building into a light-filled, flexible facility that promotes collaboration and hands-on learning. In addition to programming, Ballinger served as the design architect and worked closely with local architect of record TMP Architecture.

Ballinger’s design rejuvenated the building by replacing the windowless brick walls with nearly 18,000 square feet of low-e glass. Double-height, naturally-lit lounges create an open, transparent environment.

Student and faculty can choose from a wide variety of flexible study and meeting space.   A new café and lounge welcome students and encourage spontaneous inter-disciplinary collaboration. Students hone their skills in THSL’s 30 realistic patient care rooms and by using the Anatomage Table, a life-sized interactive visualization system for anatomy education.

GW Science and Engineering Hall Achieves LEED Gold

George Washington University’s Science and Engineering Hall (SEH) was awarded LEED Gold by the United States Green Building Council (USCBC). At the start of schematic design GW challenged Ballinger to design SEH without multiplying the University’s carbon footprint. The resulting design is an academic building that is unparalleled at GW in scope and function, as well as eco-friendly. The building’s sustainable strategies were an interdisciplinary collaboration between Ballinger’s architecture and engineering studios. Sustainable strategies include:

Power from a Co-Generation System
The project sponsored the creation of and receives its power from a new co-generation power system that will reduce the building’s carbon footprint by more than half, saving 8,100 metric tons of carbon dioxide each year.

Enthalpy Wheels
Enthalpy Wheels are incorporated into all air handling units for the building. This technology recycles the once wasted energy from the exhausted air of the building in order to heat or cool incoming air, reducing energy needs. The savings are expected to pay for the system in less than three years.

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Chilled Beams
Chilled Beams, suspended from the ceiling, are utilized throughout the project and use water to cool the air more efficiently than a conventional air-conditioning system.

Green Roof
Vegetation covers more than 10,000 SF of the roof, keeping the building cool by absorbing heat from the sun while also reducing rainwater runoff. The remaining upper roof area is a light-colored, high albedo roof to further maximize heat reflectance. Rain from the roof areas drains into a 42,000-gallon cistern where it is filtered and then used to flush toilets, saving roughly 850,000 gallons of water per year.