Articles Tagged with: Healthcare
Accelerating Change through Evidence-Based Design

As a Cornerstone partner of the Center for Health Design, Ballinger advances the mission of improving the quality of healthcare through design of the built environment. Ballinger has been an active participant in the Center’s work, including the Pebble Project, a national research initiative to formalize an evidence-based design process. The goal is to create a ripple effect by documenting peer-reviewed examples of healthcare environments that employ evidence-based design and then assess outcomes.

Ballinger participated in the planning of two Pebble Projects: the University of Maryland Medical Center’s Shock Trauma Critical Care Tower and the Weill Greenberg Ambulatory Care Center at Weill Cornell Medicine. The Weill Greenberg Center was one of the nation’s first Pebble Projects, and research on the design impacts was published in the peer-reviewed Health Environments Research + Design (HERD) Journal.

In line with the mission to share knowledge, Ballinger leaders have also presented lectures and webinars at learning sessions organized by Center. We are proud to contribute to the Center’s ultimate goal of improving patient outcomes.

Read more on Ballinger’s partnership with the Center for Health Design

Ballinger to Lead Tour of Penn Medicine Radnor

Ballinger and IMC Construction will conduct a guided tour of Penn Medicine Radnor, organized by AIA Philadelphia’s
Academy of Architecture for Health (AAH) committee.

Penn Medicine Radnor

Ballinger’s Eric Swanson, Christina Grimes and Jason Cole will walk attendees through the new 250,000 SF outpatient facility, scheduled to open later this year. The design prioritizes wellness and sustainability: the building and its attached 1000-car garage wrap around a courtyard garden, bringing natural light and calming views to patients, families, and staff inside.

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The tour will be held today, Friday, February 21, from 4-5pm.

Registration

Penn Medicine Radnor

Philadelphia Business Journal Highlights Chester County Hospital Expansion

Senior Reporter John George at the Philadelphia Business Journal recently profiled Chester County Hospital‘s largest expansion in the medical center’s 125-year history, designed by Ballinger and currently in construction.

Excerpted from the Philadelphia Business Journal:

Penn Medicine’s Chester County Hospital is getting ready to debut the first phase of the largest expansion project in the West Chester medical center’s 125-year history.

15065_00_N7_highPatient care at the $300 million, five-story patient tower — which will have 99 private rooms — will begin Jan. 27.

“We’ve been growing rapidly over the past five years and we couldn’t sustain that growth,” said Michael Duncan, the hospital’s president. “We have one wing that is 60 years old. We need more space and bigger operating rooms.”

Admissions at the hospital climbed from 14,890 in 2014 to 16,790 last year. During that same time, emergency department visits increased from 43,240 to 45,161.

With the new addition, Chester County Hospital will grow from 240 licensed beds to 301 licensed beds with all private rooms. The patient tower is expected to add about 50 new jobs at the hospital, which now has 2,482 employees.

The expansion will make the hospital the largest in Chester County, passing Paoli Hospital, which underwent a major expansion in 2009.

Features of the 250,000 square-foot expansion project include:

  • 15 operating room suites, including three high-tech labs for cardiac catheterization and electrophysiology procedures and one hybrid operating room
  • New areas for non-invasive cardiology and pre-procedure testing
  • A rooftop helipad
  • An outpatient pharmacy offering

The project — which boasts an abundance of natural lighting, a courtyard and a green roof — is also creating space for a bistro (serving Starbucks coffee) and enhanced space for the Women’s Auxiliary gift shop in the new Knauer Family Lobby.

A 26,000-square-foot emergency department expansion is scheduled to be completed in the spring.15065_00_N8_high

Chester County Hospital contracted with Philadelphia firm Ballinger for architecture services and hired L.F. Driscoll of Bala Cynwyd as the builder.

Duncan said the hospital’s decision to join the University of Pennsylvania Health System was done in large part to gain better access to the capital markets to fund the project. He said the two organizations also shared similar visions for the hospital’s future growth.

“Penn Medicine was all in with its commitment to Chester County,” said Duncan, noting Chester County Hospital spoke with 17 potential partners before deciding to go with Penn.

Duncan said often when a community hospital aligns with a large health system, the goal is to use the smaller hospitals to gain referrals.

“Penn Medicine’s model is the opposite,” he said. “They are an exporter, bringing their advanced services closer to patients.”

Duncan said the TAVR (transcatheter aortic valve replacement), robotic bypass and bariatric surgery programs that will be part of the new building are examples of that.

Larry Bell, senior project manager for the expansion, said the new patient tower will feature the latest in technology, including 75-inch monitors that will replace whiteboards in patient rooms. He also noted monitors can be found throughout the operating and procedure rooms.

“It will make it easy for a doctor who is consulting with another doctor,” Bell said. “The doctor can be down the hall or up at Penn and they can see what is happening.”

Duncan said some of the technology at West Chester Hospital is being beta-tested in West Chester for use in the $1.5 billion pavilion Penn is building in West Philadelphia.

The last major expansion at the Chester County Hospital occurred in 2014 with the opening of the 93,000-square foot Lasko Tower. That project added 72 rooms for heart patients along with a mother and baby pavilion and an orthopedic/surgical recovery unit.

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Bryn Mawr Project Honored for Construction Excellence

Bryn Mawr Hospital’s new patient pavilion was presented with the General Builder Contractors Association (GBCA) Construction Excellence Award in the healthcare category last evening at the 22nd annual Construction Excellence Awards (CEA).

Ballinger provided MEP engineering services for the project, which was created in response to the Mainline Health System’s need for a market-competitive, contemporary healthcare facility committed to serving its community. Delivering on this need, the facility includes improvements such as private rooms, two medical/surgical telemetry units, an intensive care unit, a high-tech surgical suite, and maternity, labor and delivery, and NICU units. LEED Silver certification, a green roof, an advanced emergency power system, and techniques to reduce long-term ownership costs showcase this project as both resilient and sustainable. Ballinger’s innovative contributions include a reimagined HVAC system that not only satisfies expectations and important healthcare guidelines, but does so while prioritizing sustainability.

Winners were honored at an awards ceremony in Center City Philadelphia on November 21.

Ballinger 4 Billion Boom

Three new Ballinger projects, Penn Medicine Chester County Hospital’s expansion, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia’s King of Prussia hospital, and Grand View Health’s new patient care building, were highlighted by the Philadelphia Business Journal in an article posted on November 1.

The article, titled “$4 Billion Boom,” describes the Philadelphia region’s current explosion in hospital construction and explains how a crop of new healthcare projects will create thousands of jobs in construction and healthcare. The work represents a shift to more outpatient settings and shortened inpatient stays, as well as the role of the consumer in selecting healthcare providers and facilities.

Link to article in the Philadelphia Business Journal

NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch Center Wins Award of Merit

New York Presbyterian Hospital, David Koch Center, Location: New York NY, Architect: Pei Cobb Freed & PartnersThe NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch Center was officially honored today with the Healthcare Design (HCD) 2019 Award of Merit. This award, part of the 2019 Healthcare Design Showcase, is the highest honor that a project can receive in the program.

The 734,000 SF world-class ambulatory facility, completed in 2018, was designed through a collaboration between Ballinger, HOK, and Pei Cobb Freed & Partners. The state-of-the-art facility pushes the boundaries of innovation to provide exceptional care and a seamless patient experience for all.

Ballinger Senior Principal Louis A. Meilink, Jr., FAIA, FACHA, ACHE, and Principal Erin Nunes Cooper, AIA, ACHA, LEED AP, along with Scott Rawlings, AIA, FACHA, LEED AP, Director of Healthcare at HOK, accepted the award on behalf of all the team members who contributed to the project.

Link to NYP’s Award Profile on Healthcare Design Magazine’s Website

Ballinger Architects Honored by the American College of Healthcare Architects

Ballinger Senior Principal Louis A. Meilink, Jr., FAIA, FACHA, ACHE, Principal Erin Nunes Cooper, AIA, ACHA, LEED AP and Associate Principal Christina Grimes, AIA, LEED BD+ C, EDAC, ACHA will be honored today at a special American College of Healthcare Architects (ACHA) luncheon as part of Healthcare Design Magazine’s 2019 Healthcare Design Conference.

At the ceremony Christina and Erin will be inducted into the the ACHA, and Lou will advance to fellowship, one of the highest honors the organization bestow upon its members.

These distinctions entail a rigorous application process and represent high levels of achievement in the design and planning of healthcare facilities.

Ballinger Architects to Address Chinese Delegation

Ballinger Senior Principal Louis A. Meilink, Jr., FAIA, FACHA, ACHE and Principal Erin Nunes Cooper, AIA, ACHA, LEED AP will present a lecture tomorrow to a delegation from China representing the healthcare and design industries.

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Their talk, “The Spectrum of Technologies: Current + Future State of Healthcare,” will explore the ways technology is changing the healthcare environment. The event was organized by The Center for Healthcare Design, in conjunction with the Healthcare Design (HCD) Conference in New Orleans. This is the third year Ballinger has served as faculty for this annual education program, which seeks to promote exchange and education about healthcare design.

Erin Nunes Cooper Inducted into American College of Healthcare Architects

Ballinger’s Erin Nunes Cooper, AIA, ACHA, LEED AP was recently accepted as a 2019 Board Certified member of the American College of Healthcare Architects (ACHA).

The ACHA is an organization dedicated to improving the quality of environments for healing by offering certification in the specialized field of healthcare architecture. The College’s rigorous certification process includes healthcare project experience, completion of an approved educational program, and an exam assessing knowledge and skills requisite to high-quality performance in the practice of healthcare architecture.

Erin has served as project manager for many significant healthcare projects at Ballinger, and has guided client teams at NewYork-Presbyterian, NYU Langone Health, The Brooklyn Hospital and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. This year she was named to Healthcare Design Magazine’s HCD 10, which recognizes contributors to the healthcare design community who have made significant achievements and innovations in the field.

Erin and fellow Ballinger ACHA inductee Christina Grimes, AIA, LEED AP, ACHA, EDAC will be recognized at the College’s Annual Luncheon during the Healthcare Design Conference on November 3 in New Orleans.

Christina Grimes Inducted into American College of Healthcare Architects

Ballinger’s Christina Grimes, AIA, LEED BD+ C, EDAC, ACHA,was recently accepted as a 2019 Board Certified member of the American College of Healthcare Architects (ACHA).

The ACHA is an organization dedicated to improving the quality of environments for healing by offering certification in the specialized field of healthcare architecture. The College’s rigorous certification process includes healthcare project experience, portfolio, completion of an approved educational program, and an exam assessing knowledge and skills requisite to high-quality performance in the practice of healthcare architecture.

Christina Grimes has led the healthcare planning of projects for Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Penn Medicine, Cooper University Health Care, and Tower Health in addition to work with other organizations.  In 2017 she was also named to Healthcare Design Magazine’s HDC 10, which recognizes contributors to the healthcare design community who have made significant achievements and innovations in the field.

Ballinger Ranked Among Top 40 Healthcare Giants

Ballinger was recently named to Interior Design’s list of Top 40 Healthcare Giants for 2019, ranking #35. Ranking are based on healthcare design fees for the 2017-2018 year.

The vast scale of modern healthcare can be overwhelming and designers can play an important role in humanizing the care environment and experience. Ballinger’s approach to designing for healthcare is a collaborative effort to understand a client’s mission, project goals and desires, and to translate those expectations into an environment that goes beyond a functional solution to an exceptional place. We bring passion and leadership to our work to create patient, family and caregiver-friendly environments that foster health and healing.

Link to Interior Design’s 2019 list of Top 40 Healthcare Giants

 

Ballinger Senior Principal Louis Meilink Elevated to Fellow

Ballinger Senior Principal Louis A. Meilink, Jr. was recently elevated to Fellow of the American College of Healthcare Architects (ACHA). This distinction is given to ACHA members who have demonstrated an impact in healthcare facility architecture as well as significant leadership in advancing innovation within their practice and beyond.

For over 30 years Lou has led the design of significant healthcare buildings, each informed by the values of his design philosophy: building for wellness, including family as members of the care team, humanizing the hospital, encouraging interdisciplinary collaboration, providing space to support caregivers, and improving safety and satisfaction. Beyond his day-to-day project and firm responsibilities, he is engaged in an ongoing dialogue with healthcare professionals across the globe to increase the evidence base and foster healing through design.

In addition to this distinction, one of the highest honors bestowed upon a member of the ACHA, Lou was also named a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) this year. Lou, as well as Ballinger ACHA inductees Erin Nunes Cooper AIA, ACHA, LEED AP and Christina Grimes, AIA, LEED AP, ACHA, EDAC, will be honored at the College’s Annual Luncheon during the Healthcare Design Conference on November 3 in New Orleans.

Link to the ACHA’s announcement of the 2019 class of fellows:

Ballinger’s Erin Nunes Cooper Profiled by Healthcare Design Magazine

Ballinger’s Erin Nunes Cooper, AIA, ACHA, LEED AP was recently named to Healthcare Design’s HCD 10, recognizing contributors to the healthcare design community who have made significant achievements and innovations in the field.

Healthcare Design published in their magazine a full spread on each of this year’s winners. Erin’s profile includes key insights to her industry presence both professionally and personally and includes interesting discussion of her mission statements, biography, year in review, future plans, and more.

HCD 10 award winners across ten categories were recognized at a dinner on September 5, part of the HCD Forum in Asheville, NC, and at the 2019 Healthcare Design Conference in New Orleans.

Link to Erin’s profile in Healthcare Design Magazine

Grand View Health Announces Expansion Plans

Grand View Health recently announced plans for a new 170,000 SF hospital expansion, one of several components of a 5-year, $210,000,000 investment in providing improved access to high-quality, affordable healthcare.

Planned, designed and engineered by Ballinger, the 5-floor hospital expansion will be constructed adjacent to Grand View’s existing hospital in Sellersville, PA. The design prioritizes wellness for patients, family and staff while integrating state-of-the-art technology and enhanced community connections. The design features a new main entrance and light-filled public space, aimed at improving the patient experience while maintaining the culture and values Grand View Health has upheld since its founding in 1913. The expansion will include an integrated procedural platform with operating and interventional rooms, as well as private inpatient rooms, which will enable Grand View Health to offer all private rooms campus-wide.

Currently in schematic design, the project is scheduled for completion in 2023.

Ballinger to present on Healthcare Planning and Design’s “Big Five”

Healthcare buildings of today must be flexible in order to remain relevant tomorrow. How can we design buildings that remain malleable in the face of uncertainty? Ballinger Senior Principal Louis A. Meilink, Jr, FAIA, ACHA, ACHE and Principal Erin Nunes Cooper, AIA, LEED AP will address these concerns at the New York Health Design Insights Networking Event on September 26. The talk, “The Big Five: Healthcare Planning and Design Strategies for an Adaptable Future,” will focus on the impact of floor to floor heights, column spacing, fixed vertical elements, targeted zones of flexibility, and resiliency on a healthcare facility’s future adaptability.

Link to Presentation

Ballinger’s Erin Nunes Cooper named to Healthcare Design’s HCD 10

Ballinger’s Erin Nunes Cooper, AIA, LEED AP was named to Healthcare Design’s prestigious HCD 10. The HCD 10 is a professional awards program that honors members of the healthcare design community who have demonstrated significant recent accomplishments and contributions to the field.

Erin is a Principal and Director of Project Management at Ballinger. She continues to advance Ballinger’s academic medical center portfolio and regularly presents within the office and at healthcare conferences nationwide.

In her project work, Erin is passionate about improving the quality of the built environment and the patient, family, and care team experience. She developed a formal process, in collaboration with the team, for guiding project stakeholders through decision-making using role-playing workshops with 3D printed model pieces. The process continues be a key part of Ballinger’s process for engaging users during design.

Erin’s understanding of the complexity of healthcare projects balances forward thinking design concepts with the realities of clinical requirements and regulatory approvals. She is both strategic and tactical in her leadership and synthesizes complex information to help clients come to informed decisions.

HCD 10 award winners across ten categories will be recognized at a dinner on September 5, part of the HCD Forum in Asheville, NC, and at the 2019 Healthcare Design Conference in New Orleans.

Link to Healthcare Design announcement

NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch Center wins European Healthcare Design Awards

The NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch Center was recognized at the European Healthcare Design Awards in London June 18. The project received the prestigious Healthcare Design over 25,000 SM award as well as the Design Innovation for Quality Improvement award. The program, organized by Architects for Health and SALUS Global Knowledge Exchange, celebrate professional excellence in the design of healthcare environments around the world. The awards were presented at a ceremony during the European Healthcare Design 2019 Congress in London.

Link to announcement 

NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch Center Receives Top Award

Healthcare Design (HCD) magazine selected the NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch Center to receive an Award of Merit, the highest level of recognition, in the 2019 Healthcare Design Showcase.

The 734,000 SF David H. Koch Center is designed to house innovative clinical approaches and cutting-edge technology, resulting in exceptional care and a seamless patient experience. Characterized by warmth and transparency, the design features clear circulation, light-filled spaces, and standardized procedure rooms and patient areas that enable adaptability as requirements and technologies evolve.

The annual Healthcare Design awards program, now in its 19th year, honors the best design and architecture in the healthcare industry. Seventeen jurors, appointed by HCD’s partner organizations (The Center for Health Design, IIDA, and ASID), evaluated the submissions. Awards will be presented during the 2019 HCD Conference and published in the August 2019 issue of Healthcare Design.

The project was a design collaboration between Ballinger, HOK and Pei Cobb Freed & Partners.

Link to announcement

European Healthcare Design Awards recognize NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch Center

The NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch Center was shortlisted for two European Healthcare Design Awards. The project is a finalist in the Healthcare Design over 25,000 SM and Design Innovation for Quality Improvement categories. The awards, organized by Architects for Health and SALUS Global Knowledge Exchange, celebrate professional excellence in the design of healthcare environments around the world. The awards will be presented at a ceremony during the European Healthcare Design 2019 Congress in London on June 18.

Link to announcement 

NewYork-Presbyterian’s imaging and surgical suite provides first-of-its-kind clinical care

Recently celebrating one year in operation, the NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch Center is a world-class ambulatory care facility that combines cutting-edge technology with innovative clinical approaches to ensure a seamless patient experience from diagnosis to treatment.  The MRI/PET/Angiography Suite, which includes a first-of-its-kind procedure room integrating scanning and surgical procedures, is a prime example of the ideas and innovations that are central to the building’s design.

The suite combines key imaging technologies used for minimally-invasive procedures, including MRI/PET, fluoroscopy, ultrasound and rotational CT, with a fixed Angio C-arm in an operating room setting.  A flexible central table design provides access to all of these technologies in a single room. In addition, procedure verification occurs through real-time advanced imaging registration technology, streamlining treatment and reducing the need for multiple patient visits.

“We are proud to have collaborated with NewYork-Presbyterian to create this unique space,” says Ballinger Project Architect Shawn Billiard, RA.  “This co-location and arrangement of equipment allows clinicians to diagnose, plan, and precisely guide procedures all in one place, at one time.”

Ballinger, responsible for clinical planning and design within the NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch Center, utilized 3D-printed models of people, equipment and furniture to explore and rapidly assess possible room configurations in order to efficiently advance the suite’s design process with various NewYork-Presbyterian stakeholder groups. This highly-effective workshop style, used for clinical spaces throughout the hospital, helped clinicians quickly understand spatial and design issues and was critical to the room’s success.

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The NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch Center was designed in a collaboration between Ballinger, HOK, and Pei Cobb Freed & Partners.

Ballinger presents “The Big Five” Healthcare Planning + Design Strategies

Ballinger Senior Principal Louis A. Meilink, Jr., FAIA, ACHA, ACHE, and Associate Principal Erin Nunes Cooper, AIA, LEED AP were invited to speak at the spring 2019 Architecture-For-Health Lecture Series at Texas A&M University. The televised series, “Health Systems and Networks: The New Clients,” is hosted by the College of Architecture and the Health Science Center School of Public Health.

The presentation examined the “Big Five” key design decisions that enable adaptability in an ever-changing healthcare landscape. Described through case studies of recent projects, the presentation covered trends in health systems, patient-centered care and technology.

Link to video of presentation

NewYork-Presbyterian ambulatory care center cover story in Healthcare Design

Healthcare Design magazine published a cover story about the 740,000 SF NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch Center. The article, titled “Vision Realized,” was written by Anne DiNardo about the unique collaboration that resulted in NewYork-Presbyterian’s award-winning ambulatory care center.

Ballinger Associate Principal Erin Nunes Cooper, AIA, LEED AP is quoted in the article, describing the role-playing workshops Ballinger organized to engage stakeholders. With 3D-printed models, users were able to explore room layouts and equipment arrangements. “Using the models was a simple but effective way to bring the rooms to life, building excitement for the project with stakeholders and involving them early on in key design decisions.”

The project was a collaboration among Ballinger, HOK and Pei Cobb Freed & Partners.

Link to article

 

Ballinger expert interviewed on WHYY’s The Pulse

The latest episode of WHYY’s health and science program, The Pulse, includes a segment on hospital design, featuring Ballinger associate principal Erin Nunes Cooper, AIA, LEED AP. Host Maiken Scott interviewed Erin about why healthcare facilities can be confusing, and the tools architects use to improve wayfinding and increase efficiency. They also explored the themes of flexibility and warmth in healthcare environments. “A current and modern hospital should send a message that it’s a welcoming place – a place to heal, rather than a place to be sick,” Erin explained.

The Pulse is recorded at WHYY in Philadelphia and broadcasts on over 50 local NPR stations nationwide.

Listen to the full episode

Bryn Mawr Hospital Celebrates Opening of New Patient Pavilion

Bryn Mawr Hospital, part of Main Line Health, celebrated the opening of a new 256,400 SF eight-floor patient pavilion. Ballinger provided MEP and fire protection engineering services for the transformative modernization. The engineering team was tasked with prioritizing patient safety in the event of an emergency, while also reducing energy use.

The new power system for the campus has 100% emergency backup via onsite generators. This enables the hospital to operate in “island mode,” meaning hospital operations can continue without service interruption, even in the event that the hospital is isolated from the local electricity distribution network.

The pavilion is designed to meet LEED Silver requirements, as outlined by the United States Green Building Council (USGBC). The new operating room (OR) platform employs a Dedicated Outside Air System (DOAS) with active desiccant dehumidification and individual air handlers for each OR space.  This system allows each OR to be individually set to a temperature between 60 and 80 degrees and maintain humidity between 30% RH and 50% RH without using reheat energy. Individual temperature and humidity controls increase staff and patient comfort and contribute to reducing energy costs. Ballinger also designed an upgraded 5,200 ton chiller plant and a high-rise fire sprinkler system that includes pioneering technology to avoid requiring pressure-reducing valves throughout the system, saving long term ownership costs. Other sustainable features include LED lighting controls and green roofs.

The Big 5: Healthcare Planning and Design Strategies for an Adaptable Future

Ballinger Principal Louis A. Meilink, Jr., AIA, ACHA, ACHE and Associate Principal Erin Nunes Cooper, AIA, LEED AP presented “The Big 5: Healthcare Planning and Design Strategies for an Adaptable Future” at the 2018 Healthcare Design Conference in Phoenix. The presentation examined the key design decisions that enable adaptability in an ever-changing healthcare landscape. Utilizing digital audience polling, the presenters facilitated real-time information exchange among attendees about key planning decisions and perceptions. Produced by Healthcare Design magazine in association with the AIA Academy of Architecture for Health, the conference showcases research, trends and strategies in the healthcare design industry.

Link to presentation

Penn Medicine Radnor Breaks Ground

Officials broke ground today on a new outpatient facility in Radnor for Penn Medicine. Ballinger designed the 250,000 SF building, providing architectural and structural engineering services. Attendees at the groundbreaking included Ballinger design principal Eric Swanson, AIA, project manager Thomas J. Parr, Jr., AIA, senior project healthcare planner Christina Grimes, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, EDAC, lead project designer Jason Cole, LEED AP, and project architect Michael Euker, RA.

Designed for LEED Silver certification, the 4-story facility and attached 1000-car garage will form three sides of an inward-focused campus. The building will wrap around a courtyard, bringing natural light and calming views to patients, families, and staff inside. A circulation corridor around the interior garden enhances wayfinding and serves to orient patients. Within the garden are lawns and groves landscaped with native plants.

NewYork-Presbyterian Opens a World-Class Center for Ambulatory Care

A Seamless Patient Experience, Designed to Reduce Stress and Anxiety, Keeps the Focus on Healing

On April 24, 2018, NewYork-Presbyterian (NYP) celebrated the opening of the David H. Koch Center, a world-class ambulatory care center that combines innovative clinical approaches and cutting-edge technology to provide exceptional care and a seamless patient experience.

The design is a collaboration among Ballinger as Medical Architect, HOK as Architect, and Pei Cobb Freed & Partners as Consulting Architect for building envelope and lobby.

The approximately 740,000-sq.-ft. facility, located at the NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center campus on York Avenue and 68th Street, is home to a wide range of ambulatory care services, including outpatient surgery, interventional radiology, diagnostic imaging and infusion services, as well as an Integrative Health and Wellbeing program that will open in June.

“Our goal in creating the NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch Center was to develop a new vision for what ambulatory care could be by focusing first and foremost on patients’ needs and the delivery of exceptional care,” said Dr. Steven J. Corwin, president and CEO of NewYork-Presbyterian. “Every decision about the design and operation of this building was made with the patient in mind, from the quick and easy check-in to the private prep and recovery rooms, light-filled treatment areas and real-time status updates. This is truly an environment that was designed for healing, and we believe it represents the future of ambulatory care.”

For patients, the NYP David H. Koch Center will serve as a one-stop destination for individualized, coordinated care from diagnosis to treatment. Multidisciplinary teams of physicians from Weill Cornell Medicine, working collaboratively under one roof, will consider each patient holistically, whether they are being treated for digestive diseases, cancer or other conditions, or coming for outpatient surgery, interventional radiology or diagnostic imaging.

Smart technology and smart spaces are central to the design and function of the building to make patient visits as smooth and pleasant as possible. For example, patients can complete their paperwork remotely and securely before their visit, on their mobile phone or online. Upon arrival, they will be offered a personalized “smartband” that provides access to the building and receive information about their visit and step-by-step directions to their room through the NYP app. Each patient’s visit has a clear, planned flow that begins and ends in the same space for patients having a procedure — a private prep and recovery room that serves as “home base” for them and their companions throughout their visit.

Technology is central to delivering exceptional, cutting-edge care. A prime example is the NYP David H. Koch Center’s MRI/PET/Angiography suite, the first of its kind in the world. Combining all of the key imaging technologies used for minimally-invasive procedures, including MRI/PET, fluoroscopy, ultrasound, and rotational CT, it enables clinicians to diagnose, plan, and precisely guide procedures and verify their completeness. The NYP David H. Koch Center features three linear accelerators, including New York’s first MRI-guided linear accelerator for precision radiation treatment of tumors.

Additional clinical features include:

  • 12 operating suites, 6 interventional radiology procedure rooms, and 11 endoscopic procedure rooms, including an operating room dedicated to breast surgery with mammography and ultrasound equipment.
  • Decentralized clinical care with stations directly outside private patient rooms, offering patients easier access to their care team.
  • Radiation oncology services located on the light-filled 4th floor, thanks to the building’s unique engineering. Unlike many institutions, there are no basement treatment areas here.
  • Easy access to discharge instructions, test results and video follow-up appointments with physicians through the NYP app.

Sustainability and Resiliency
The NYP David H. Koch Center is designed to be highly sustainable, from its green roof, which can detain up to six inches of storm water, to its high-performance building envelope. The distinctive “skin” consists of triple-paned insulated glazing with a slatted wood screen, which significantly reduces solar glare, building heat gain, and the need for solar and privacy shading.

The building is also resilient in the case of an extreme weather event or disruption to city power, with heating equipment, air handling units, emergency generators and other key operational equipment located on higher floors above potential flood levels.

Enhanced Care for Patients
The design features a soothing palette of materials including wood and stone. A typical procedure floor has a sky lobby, 12 flexible procedure rooms, and 36 private prep and recovery rooms. Procedure preparation and recovery occur in the same dedicated room, which helps minimize patient movements and provides peace of mind for the patient, family, and care team.

Circulation is clear, with a separation of “on-stage” and “off-stage” flows so patients and families can travel along the light-filled perimeter corridors with clear wayfinding, and staff can move efficiently throughout the building, minimizing disruption to guests.

Infusion and radiation oncology areas – typically located on lower levels – are co-located on the 4th floor of the building. This allows patients and staff access to natural light, an example of the extraordinary accommodations made at the NYP David H. Koch Center to prioritize patient-centered care. The infusion area features a variety of treatment environments ranging from private rooms to warm and inviting community spaces.

NewYork-Presbyterian Alexandra Cohen Hospital for Women and Newborns
Beginning in 2020, the top five-and-a-half floors of the building will become home to the NewYork-Presbyterian Alexandra Cohen Hospital for Women and Newborns, the first of its kind in the tri-state area, offering compassionate, personalized care to pregnant women, newborn babies and their families. The 220,000-square-foot hospital within a hospital will feature 75 private rooms, 16 labor and delivery rooms, five cesarean section operative suites, 20 maternal critical assessment and treatment unit rooms and 15 ultrasound rooms, which will offer state-of-the-art visualization. The neonatal intensive care unit features 60 positions in private rooms, and is set to be the first facility in New York City to have MRI capabilities and an operating room in its neonatal intensive care unit.

 Team
NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch Center
Medical Architect: Ballinger
Architect: HOK
Consulting Architect (building envelope and lobby): Pei Cobb Freed & Partners
Interior Design: Ballinger and HOK
Structural Engineer: Thornton Tomasetti
MEP: Syska Hennesy Group
Construction Manager: Turner Construction Company
Lobby Art: Paqutá (2018) by Beatriz Milhazes

Post-Occupancy Evaluation Published for Penn Medicine Lancaster General Health’s Ann B. Barshinger Cancer Institute

Ballinger recently published a Post-Occupancy Evaluation (POE) of the Ann B. Barshinger Cancer Institute at Penn Medicine’s Lancaster General Health. Ballinger conducts POE’s to assess and monitor how buildings are being used. This data informs how future designs can best foster healing and optimize the healthcare experience for patients, families, and caregivers. The research team was led by Ballinger Principal, Louis A. Meilink, Jr., AIA, ACHA, ACHE; Senior Associate, Amy Floresta, AIA, LEED AP; and Healthcare Planner, Christina Grimes, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, EDAC.

The objective of the POE was to understand which planning and design intentions have been most successfully realized, where user adaptations have been made, and the reasons for change. The team began by gathering both qualitative and quantitative data through an on-line survey to patients and staff, on-site interviews with staff, and on-site observation. These varied collection points allowed the evaluation team to triangulate issues that permeate all groups. The data was then evaluated using three categories: the overall building design and the perception of its spaces, how shifts in operations and procedure have affected staff culture, and patient experience.

The results suggest that the design was successful in fulfilling Lancaster General Health’s vision of providing an extraordinary experience every time. The iconic and integrated nature of the building has increased the hospital’s ability to attract and retain talented physicians and caregivers. Patients reported spending a significant amount of time utilizing the building amenities, which can be attributed, in part, to the presence of nature throughout these areas. The clinical layout was designed to provide a quiet and calming atmosphere. By separating the “on-stage” clinical environment from “off-stage” staff circulation, noise, traffic, and disruption were reduced. Decentralization supply stations reduced walking distances for staff and increased their time with patients. Overall, respondents found these planning strategies effective in improving the healthcare experience.

View the post-occupancy evaluation

Ballinger Recognized at the Design + Health 12th World Congress

Ballinger’s work was recognized at the Design + Health International Academy Awards held in Vienna, Austria during the Design + Health World Congress.

Penn Medicine: Lancaster General Health Ann B. Barshinger Cancer Institute won an award for its use of art in public and private spaces and was the overall winner in the Interior Design category. Reading HealthPlex for Advanced Surgical and Patient Care won an award in the category of Sustainable Urban and Built Environment.

The Design + Health International Academy Awards is a leading advocacy program recognizing professional excellence in the research and practice of designing healthy built environments.

Ballinger principals Louis Meilink, Jr., AIA, ACHA, ACHE and Eric Swanson, AIA accepted the awards at a gala dinner at Vienna’s historical City Hall, chaired by Professor Alan Dilani, founder of the International Academy for Design + Health.

Ballinger Presents at the Design + Health 12th World Congress

Ballinger principals Louis Meilink, Jr., AIA, ACHA, ACHE and Eric Swanson, AIA attended the International Academy for Design and Health (IADH) Design + Health World Congress held in Vienna, Austria July 12-16. The program for the conference and exhibition explored public health on a global scale.

Louis and Eric presented the recently completed Reading HealthPlex for Advanced Surgical and Patient Care in a talk titled “A Closer Look at the U.S. Healthcare Built Environment.”

With experts from the UK, Italy, Sweden, Australia, South Africa, Taiwan, Brazil and others, the conference was an opportunity to exchange ideas and review progress to improve patient care.

Post-Occupancy Research Exhibited at European Healthcare Design Congress and SALUS Global Knowledge Exchange

As part of Ballinger’s commitment to designing facilities that optimize the healthcare experience for patients, families, and staff, our teams conduct post-occupancy evaluations (POE) on completed projects to assess and monitor how they are used. Particularly illuminating was a recent POE conducted on the new Lasko Tower at Penn Medicine Chester County Hospital (PMCCH).

The research team, led by Ballinger Principal Louis Meilink, Jr., AIA, ACHA, ACHE and Senior Project Healthcare Planner Christina Grimes, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, EDAC, assessed how effective the inclusion of decentralized caregiver stations are toward improving staff and patient experience in the medical/surgical inpatient environment. By comparing four new floors of the tower, each with a unique layout featuring decentralized caregiver stations, to the hospital’s existing units which previously accommodated the same patient populations and were built with a single caregiver station, they were able to control for patient populations and consistent staff. The result was a study focused solely ¬on the physical environment.

The POE findings were strongly indicative of the benefits of decentralized caregiver stations. Patient and staff overall satisfaction scores increased by 113% in the new Lasko Tower units as compared to the pre-existing hospital units featuring central nursing cores. Sixty-six percent of staff felt that decentralized stations improved their ability to deliver quality patient care, and ninety-one percent of patients said that the stations improved the way they felt cared for in the new building. The decentralized stations resulted in reduced walking distances and increased patient time for staff, as well as improved fall rates and noise levels for patients. These results suggest an improved patient care environment.

The study was displayed at the 2017 European Healthcare Design Congress held at the Royal College of Physicians in London, UK, and published by SALUS Global Knowledge Exchange, a global media, publishing and research organization whose mission is improving human and planetary health.

Link to Poster

 

Post-Occupancy Evaluation White Paper Published by the American College of Healthcare Architects

A white paper by Ballinger principal Louis Meilink, Jr., AIA, ACHA, ACHE and Senior Healthcare Planner Debbie Phillips, AIA, ACHA, EDAC was published by the American College of Healthcare Architects and appeared in the Summer 2017 ACHA Quarterly Newsletter.

The Ballinger team conducted a post-occupancy evaluation at Penn Medicine Chester County Hospital (PMCCH) comparing the recently completed Lasko Tower, designed by Ballinger, to a unit in the neighboring West Building.

Since the move from West Building to Lasko Tower, the hospital has seen significant improvements in HCAHPS and staff satisfaction. The results from this study informed Ballinger’s design for PMCCH’s next bed tower, currently under construction.

Link to white paper

Post-Occupancy Evaluation Published for Penn Medicine Chester County Hospital’s Lasko Tower

As part of Ballinger’s commitment to designing facilities that optimize the healthcare experience for patients, families and staff, our teams conduct post-occupancy evaluations (POE) on completed projects to assess and monitor how the buildings are being used. Ballinger recently published a POE on their design for the Lasko Tower at Penn Medicine Chester County Hospital, completed in 2015. The research team, led by Ballinger Principal Louis A. Meilink, Jr., AIA, ACHA, ACHE and healthcare planners Christina Grimes, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, EDAC and Debbie Phillips, AIA, ACHA, EDAC, assessed which planning and design interventions were most successful and what effect the unit design had on staff and patients.

Although the primary goal was to gather insights for an additional bed tower (currently under construction), it also offered an opportunity to compare patient satisfaction and operational performance against an existing 20-bed unit, the West Building (built in 1962 and renovated in 1998). Significant differences between the West unit and the Lasko Tower unit include a larger floor area with a racetrack organization of patient beds rather than a single-corridor layout, the inclusion of decentralized care stations between every two patient rooms, and more locations for staff charting.

The analysis assessed patient satisfaction with rooms and amenities, staff operations relative to charting and patient care, and housekeeping operations relative to material selection and ongoing maintenance. Because both of the units studied have private patient rooms, the evaluation enabled direct comparison between fall rates, HCAHPS scores (noise and cleanliness), and rates of hospital acquired infections (HAI). The study included a proximity index charting the travel distances between staff care stations, patient rooms and supplies, and assigned a cost/benefit metric to key design considerations.

The POE results suggest Lasko Tower is an improved patient care environment, and since moving in, the hospital has noted significant improvements in all categories. The insights gained through this study directly informed planning of the 96-room patient bed tower currently under construction.

View the post-occupancy evaluation

Japanese Delegation Tours Lasko Tower at Penn Medicine Chester County Hospital and Visits Ballinger Office

A Japanese delegation of 35 architects and healthcare administrators traveled to Pennsylvania today to tour the Ballinger-designed Lasko Tower at Penn Medicine Chester County Hospital and to visit Ballinger’s office in downtown Philadelphia.

The delegation became familiar with Lasko Tower and Ballinger’s design role when Principal Louis Meilink and Senior Healthcare Planners Christina Grimes and Debbie Phillips presented a Post-Occupancy Evaluation of Lasko Tower at the 2016 PDC Summit in San Diego. The presentation piqued the Japanese delegation’s interest and inspired their trip to Philadelphia around this year’s PDC Summit.

The delegation explored the three floors of Lasko Tower with Louis Meilink and his Ballinger colleague’s Associate Principal Tom Parr and Junko Huang serving as tour guides.

Following the Lasko Tower tour, the delegation arrived at Ballinger’s office in Philadelphia where they gave a compelling presentation on the latest design trends and healthcare facilities in Japan.

Office-wide tours and four thought-provoking healthcare topics were then presented by Ballinger healthcare team members. The topics, conceived by the delegation, explored improving patient safety, increasing staff motivation in the workplace, ensuring flexibility for the future, and the importance of codes and guidelines when designing hospitals. The topics were presented by Ballinger healthcare team members: Erin Cooper, Amy Floresta, Rob Goss, Christina Grimes, Debbie Phillips, and Eric Swanson.

The Universal Prep/Recovery: A New Paradigm or Smoke and Mirrors?

Ballinger’s Director of Healthcare Planning, Dwight Smith, AIA, NCARB, EDAC, and Senior Healthcare Planner Richard Lawless, AIA, LEED AP, EDAC presented a talk at the 2017 PDC Summit in Orlando, an annual international conference on health facility planning, design and construction.

Their presentation, “The Universal Prep/Recovery: A New Paradigm or Smoke and Mirrors?” explored the benefits and limitations of a universal room design. Building a universal room can impact construction, it can affect the clinical care model – primarily in the areas of patient safety and efficiency of the workplace environment – and it can improve consumer satisfaction.

Illustrated with examples from Ballinger’s portfolio, the presentation highlighted the benefits of multi-functional standardized spaces, such as a universal prep recovery room, to provide adaptability and flexibility for the future.

Link to Presentation

The Whole Box: Beyond Pre-Fabrication

For decades architects, engineers and contractors have speculated about how the healthcare building process can be improved. Pre-fabrication offers dramatic opportunities for construction process improvement and quality control. What are the right applications for pre-fabrication in healthcare and what factors should be considered at the start of design?

Ballinger Principals Louis Meilink, Jr., AIA, ACHA, ACHE and Barry Finkelstein, PE and Healthcare Planner Christina Grimes, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, EDAC, along with Richard Lanzarone, a Project Executive at Turner Construction Co., explored these questions at the 2017 PDC Summit in Orlando, an annual international conference on health facility planning, design and construction. Their presentation “The Whole Box: Beyond Pre-Fabrication,” illustrated the spectrum of pre-fabrication possibilities, from components to structural modules, and outlined a process to help clients determine if a project, or part of a project, is right for pre-fabrication.

Link to Presentation

Quadruple Aim and the Importance of Place

MCDQuadruple Aim and the Importance of Place, an article by Ballinger’s Louis Meilink, Jr., AIA, ACHA, ACHE and Christina Grimes, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, EDAC, was published in the March/April 2017 issue of Medical Construction and Design Magazine. The article suggests that health networks and architects must act together to put forth a diversity of healthcare facility solutions, thereby delivering the right care, at the right time, with the right price, in the right place.

Read the full article.

Evaluating the Benefits of Decentralized Stations Beyond Patient Visibility

Ballinger recently conducted a post-occupancy evaluation to assess how effective the inclusion of decentralized caregiver stations are toward improving staff and patient experience in the medical/surgical inpatient environment.

The research team focused on the Ballinger-designed Lasko Tower at Penn Medicine Chester County Hospital that was completed in 2015 and utilized data and survey results to compare the new floors, each featuring decentralized caregiver stations to existing units which previously accommodated the same patient populations and were built with a single caregiver station and no decentralized stations.  By controlling for patient populations and consistent staff, the study focused on the physical environment. Its results support a strong case for the use of decentralized stations with benefits extending beyond patient visibility.

This research was published by the AIA AAH Academy Journal in an article written by Ballinger principal Louis A. Meilink, Jr. AIA, ACHA, ACHE and senior associate Christina Grimes, AIA, LEED BD+C, EDAC entitled “The decentralized station: More than just patient visibility”.

Link to Article

The Evolving Quadruple Aim: Improving Public Health and the Importance of Place

In 2007 the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) developed the Triple Aim framework, an approach to optimizing health system performance. The idea was to simultaneously improve the patient care experience, improve the health of a population, and reduce per capita healthcare costs. Ballinger principal Louis Meilink, Jr., AIA, ACHA, ACHE paraphrases the goals of the framework as “delivering the right care for the right price at the right time.”

Given the impact of the Affordable Care Act and current trends in population health, today’s healthcare institutions and planners must also consider a fourth aim: the right place. The Evolving Quadruple Aim builds on the IHI framework to include the importance of place. By considering the location, scale and services provided within a facility, healthcare planners can optimize operations and improve population health.

Ballinger is studying the spectrum of healthcare from homecare and telehealth to academic medical centers. By understanding and balancing the benefits of on-demand access, tertiary and quaternary care, spaces for community use and other factors, Ballinger is studying and advocating for improved population health through the design of health facilities.

Louis Meilink and Senior Healthcare Planner Debbie Phillips, AIA, ACHA, EDAC, were invited to speak at the Fall 2016 Architecture-For-Health Lecture Series at Texas A&M University. The series, “The Global Impact of the Concept of Population Health on the Design of Health Networks and Health Facilities,” invites experienced public health and design professionals, who have programmed and designed healthcare facilities, to present on relevant themes. Louis and Debbie presented “Research-based Design: Fundamental to Architectural Excellence While Advancing Population Health” and answered questions from students, faculty members, design professionals and an international delegation. The presentation coincided with the annual meeting of the Texas A&M Center for Health Systems and Design’s Health Industry Advisory Council (HIAC).

Link to presentation

Opening Ceremony for Reading Hospital Healthplex

Reading Hospital Medical Center held an opening ceremony for its new state-of-the-art Reading HealthPlex in West Reading, PA.

This Ballinger-designed surgical tower complex consolidates campus-wide surgical services including pre-admission testing, an eight-room procedural suite, and the addition of a surgical center with 24 operating rooms including four hybrid rooms and two daVinci System robotic surgery rooms.

From left to right: Helen Joo, Jacob Shoemaker, Louis Meilink, Dr. Robert Brigham, Rob Goss, Tom Parr, and Dennis Meskill. 

From left to right: Helen Joo, Jacob Shoemaker, Louis Meilink, Dr. Robert Brigham, Rob Goss, Tom Parr, and Dennis Meskill.

Members of Ballinger’s team attended the event where Tower Health System leadership, including Dr. Robert Brigham, for whom the surgical center is named, gave speeches to the audience. Dr. Brigham has said of the new building, “We are going to offer a whole new experience for the patients, a much more conducive environment to healing and to recovery. We are going to be able to offer much greater technology to expand our minimally invasive surgery techniques in the realms of cardiac surgery, vascular surgery, and neurosurgery. This is really advancing healthcare in our community and will transform the way we deliver health care in our community.”

The design of this 465,000 SF building focuses on the patient/family experience and integration with the existing Hospital campus by taking advantage of opportunities for connectivity, advanced medical care, and enhanced use of green space. Maximized daylighting and views of the 88,000 SF accessible green roof and neighboring public gardens and art museum contribute to the healing nature of the space.

Ballinger celebrates the opening of Puentes de Salud

Ballinger attended the opening celebration of Puentes de Salud, a unique clinic that provides healthcare and innovative educational programs for Philadelphia’s rapidly growing Latino immigrant population. Ballinger donated architectural and engineering services to bring the project to life, along with clinical support from Penn Medicine, and community advocacy from the renowned chef Jose Garces.

Learn more about Puentes de Salud (Bridges to Health) here.

Photo: Ballinger Senior Associate Ben Patane, AIA, LEED AP, Dr. Steve Larson, Co-Founder of Puentes De Salud, and Ballinger’s Director of Healthcare Planning,  Dwight Smith, AIA, NCARB, EDAC

Ballinger Presents at PDC Summit 2016

At the PDC Summit 2016 in San Diego, CA, Ballinger’s Principal Louis A. Meilink, Jr., along with healthcare planners’ Christina Grimes & Debbie Phillips, and Chester County Hospital’s Director of Medical Services Cathy Weidman presented a Post Occupancy Evaluation (POE) of Penn Medicine Chester County Hospital’s new 24-bed Lasko Tower.  Although the primary goal was to gather insights for another bed tower in design, it also offered an opportunity to compare patient satisfaction and operational performance against an existing 20 bed unit, the West Building (built in 1962 and renovated in 1998).

The most significant changes between the existing unit and the new unit included a much larger floor area and a racetrack organization of patient beds rather than a single corridor.  In addition, the new Lasko Tower’s design includes decentralized care stations between every 2 patient rooms and more locations for staff charting.  The analysis reviewed multiple items including:

  • Patient satisfaction with the new room and other amenities,
  • Staff operations relative to charting and patient care, and
  • Housekeeping operations relative to material selection and ongoing maintenance.

Because both units had private patient rooms, there was a more direct comparison between fall rates, HCAHPS scores (noise & cleanliness), and rates of hospital acquired infections (HAI).  Since the move, the hospital has seen significant improvements in all categories.

The study assigned a cost/benefit metric to key design considerations including private rooms, decentralized care stations, supply locations, and family amenities.  The study also included a Proximity Index charting the travel distances between staff care stations, patient rooms and supplies.  Insights gained will directly inform plans for the future 96-room patient bed tower design scheduled to be built in 2018.

Data collection method: 117 staff and 50 patient survey responses, onsite observation and onsite interviews with staff (December 2015).

Link to Presentation

The Ballinger presentation at the PDC Summit 2016 utilized live polling software to gauge the audience’s perspectives on several healthcare design topics.  When asked the question “Which intervention had the Highest Impact for the Least Cost?” the audience made up of architects /engineers and healthcare staff responded:  70% Decentralized Station; 18% Noise Reducing Measures; 9% Décor + Material; 3% Size of the Patient Room.

Link to Video of Polling

Topping Out Ceremony for NewYork-Presbyterian’s Ambulatory Care Center

On February 21, 2016, NewYork-Presbyterian held a beam signing ceremony to mark the installation of the final beam in the NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital Ambulatory Care Center. Expected to open in 2018, the state-of-the-art facility marks the first hospital and inpatient facility to be constructed across York Avenue. Existing residential and medical office spaces were decanted from the site in order to provide a sizable 42,000 SF footprint for a new building. Rising 18 stories, and comprising 724,000 SF, Ballinger was the healthcare planner for the building and Medical Architect for the healthcare floors located on floors 4-18.

ToppingOut-Larsen - 35

Members of Ballinger’s team Louis Meilink, Eric Swanson, Erin Cooper and Don Semler attended the ceremony, including the signing of the final beam.

ToppingOut-Larsen - 9

Ballinger Applies 3D Printing Technology as a Hands-On Tool for Streamlining Healthcare Design

Three-dimensional printing capabilities are becoming a fixture in Ballinger’s healthcare planning and design process. In an effort to provide clients with the most effective means to collaborate and assess options, Ballinger’s NewYork-Presbyterian Ambulatory Care Center team employed 3D printed model pieces to design 28 procedure rooms. The model pieces were used in interdisciplinary role playing workshops with users during schematic design and design development.

Rather than using 3D print technology for massing models or façade explorations, the ACC team took 3D printing to a new level, creating printed pieces of all the equipment in the procedure rooms; from surgical tables and anesthesia carts to fixed imaging equipment and waste bins. Over 250 moveable 3D printed pieces were made to cover 22 procedure case types.

The team made use of Ballinger’s in-house plastic and powder 3D printers, which allowed them to add to the fleet of pieces on-demand as the client investigated additional case types. In the user group workshops, the presence of model pieces generated excitement and cultivated a heightened level of focus and engagement – as well as fun – amongst the participants. A key advantage of this process was the ability to try various layouts quickly and efficiently, eliminating scenarios that did not work, and honing in on the details of the most promising scenarios. As a result of these sessions, room layouts were solidified early in the design process and a template design was developed for Ambulatory Surgery, Interventional Radiology, and Endoscopy procedure rooms. In a bold move, Interventional Radiology and Endoscopy were designed to be OR-like, including applying clean flow, while improving operational and space efficiency.

Building on the success of the planning process for the Ambulatory Care Center, Ballinger has continued to invest in 3D printing technologies and has applied this strategy on several other projects. Recently Ballinger had the opportunity to bring the models back to NewYork-Presbyterian for a new Women’s Hospital project.

Ballinger Helps Academic Medical Centers Move Beyond State-of-the-Art to Anticipate the Road Ahead

In the Sept-Oct 2015 issue of Medical Construction and Design, Ballinger Principal Louis Meilink Jr., AIA, ACHA, ACHE, discusses the future of Academic Medical Centers (AMC).  AMCs account for 6 percent of care providers, but contribute 20 percent of all hospital care and 40 percent of the uncompensated charity care in the US.  With a disproportionately large market share, AMCs are the first to feel the impact of regulatory and market pressures.  To neutralize pressures without sacrificing mission or quality of care, AMCs must identify strategies to ensure regenerative institutional growth.  Forward-thinking planning and design can contribute directly to the agility of these institutions.

Link to Full Article

Ballinger’s Design for Penn Medicine Radnor Unveiled

“The plans call for an 85-foot tall building with six floors above grade and one below grade that’s built into the slope of the land. The building would house radiology, rehabilitation, ambulatory surgical practices, rheumatology, cardiology, oncology and various offices and meeting rooms. There may also be an urgent care center at the location and a restaurant for patients and families.”

Images by Brooklyn Digital Foundry

Images by Brooklyn Digital Foundry

Article Link

Ballinger’s Central Utility Plant powers CHOP’s New Buerger Center for Advanced Pediatric Care

 

Long-time Ballinger client, the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, opened its doors at the new Buerger Center for Advanced Pediatric Care Monday. The Buerger Center is a major part of the new Raymond G. Perelman Campus, master planned by Ballinger. It’s powered by the Central Utility Plant, which maintains 24-hour utility generation. Utilities produced and distributed include compressed air, chilled water, hot water and electricity, among others.

Axon 1

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Ballinger’s Research on Designing for Multiple Generations Published in Health Facilities Management

Ballinger Principal Louis Meilink Jr., AIA, ACHA, ACHE and Senior Associate Christina Grimes, AIA, LEED AP, EDAC shared their analysis of multigenerational healthcare workers’ preferences in an article in Health Facilities Management.

In an effort to plan and design healthcare workplaces better, Ballinger used post-occupancy evaluation surveys to gather data on generational preferences for different kinds of working environments.

A key finding of their research is the importance of an inclusionary design process. Facilities that are designed to comprehensively address multiple generations result in a more efficient and fulfilled workforce.

Health Facilities Management is a publication of the American Hospital Association, providing comprehensive coverage of health facility design, construction and operations.

Article Link

3737 Science Center Wins ULI Award

3737 Science Center was one of seven winners of the Second Annual Willard G. “Bill” Rouse III Awards for Excellence, organized by Philadelphia’s Urban Land Institute. The Awards for Excellence recognize the best real estate projects completed within the last five years in Eastern and Central Pennsylvania, Southern New Jersey, and Delaware.

Ballinger provided MEP services for 3737 Science Center, located in the University City neighborhood of Philadelphia. This $119 million, 13-story, 334,000 SF facility accommodates clinical, laboratory, research and office programs. Tenants include Penn Medicine and gene therapy startup Spark Therapeutics, as well as support for STEM/STEAM educational initiatives for low-income secondary school students.

ULI Philadelphia Blog

Ballinger Supports the Brooklyn Hospital Foundation

Ballinger Principal Louis Meilink Jr., AIA, ACHA, ACHE and Senior Associate Erin Cooper, AIA, LEED BD+C attended the Brooklyn Hospital Foundation’s 2015 Founders Ball.

Held at the New York Marriot at the Brooklyn Bridge, the event drew a crowd of over 1,000, including Brooklyn Hospital Center President and CEO Jonathan Weld and New York City Councilwoman Laurie Cumbo. The event raised $1.4 million for the institution’s expansion of its pediatric emergency-care services.

Pictured left to right: Louis Meilink Jr., AIA, ACHA, ACHE, Erin Cooper, AIA, LEED BD+C, Joan Clark, Brooklyn Hospital Center Senior Vice President of Strategic Planning, Marketing & Communications

Founders Ball Link

Ballinger Healthcare Experts examine Evidence-Based Design in Pediatrics

Ballinger Principal Louis Meilink, Jr., AIA, ACHA and Director of Healthcare Planning Dwight Smith, AIA, EDAC discussed evidence-based design (EBD) at this year’s Healthcare Design Expo and Conference, sponsored by the Center for Health Design.

EBD research to date has predominantly focused on the adult environment, with few examples of its impact on pediatrics. Throughout the design of the Golisano Children’s Hospital at the University of Rochester Medical Center, Ballinger tested and tracked the application of EBD principles and best practice theories as they apply to pediatric spaces.

Lou Meilink and Dwight Smith, along with Golisano Children’s Hospital Chief Operating Officer Elizabeth Lattimore, presented the outcome of their design process, highlighting strategies that are translatable between adult and pediatric populations.