Articles Tagged with: Barry Finkelstein
Bryn Mawr Hospital Celebrates Opening of New Patient Pavilion

Bryn Mawr Hospital, part of Main Line Health, celebrated the opening of a new 256,400 SF eight-floor patient pavilion. Ballinger provided MEP and fire protection engineering services for the transformative modernization. The engineering team was tasked with prioritizing patient safety in the event of an emergency, while also reducing energy use.

The new power system for the campus has 100% emergency backup via onsite generators. This enables the hospital to operate in “island mode,” meaning hospital operations can continue without service interruption, even in the event that the hospital is isolated from the local electricity distribution network.

The pavilion is designed to meet LEED Silver requirements, as outlined by the United States Green Building Council (USGBC). The new operating room (OR) platform employs a Dedicated Outside Air System (DOAS) with active desiccant dehumidification and individual air handlers for each OR space.  This system allows each OR to be individually set to a temperature between 60 and 80 degrees and maintain humidity between 30% RH and 50% RH without using reheat energy. Individual temperature and humidity controls increase staff and patient comfort and contribute to reducing energy costs. Ballinger also designed an upgraded 5,200 ton chiller plant and a high-rise fire sprinkler system that includes pioneering technology to avoid requiring pressure-reducing valves throughout the system, saving long term ownership costs. Other sustainable features include LED lighting controls and green roofs.

The Whole Box: Beyond Pre-Fabrication

For decades architects, engineers and contractors have speculated about how the healthcare building process can be improved. Pre-fabrication offers dramatic opportunities for construction process improvement and quality control. What are the right applications for pre-fabrication in healthcare and what factors should be considered at the start of design?

Ballinger Principals Louis Meilink, Jr., AIA, ACHA, ACHE and Barry Finkelstein, PE and Healthcare Planner Christina Grimes, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, EDAC, along with Richard Lanzarone, a Project Executive at Turner Construction Co., explored these questions at the 2017 PDC Summit in Orlando, an annual international conference on health facility planning, design and construction. Their presentation “The Whole Box: Beyond Pre-Fabrication,” illustrated the spectrum of pre-fabrication possibilities, from components to structural modules, and outlined a process to help clients determine if a project, or part of a project, is right for pre-fabrication.

Link to Presentation

Reading Hospital 7th Avenue Building Drone Footage


Focused on the patient/family experience and integration with the existing Hospital campus, the design of Reading Hospital’s new 465,000 SF 7th Avenue building turns the site and program challenges into opportunities for connectivity, enhanced green space and advanced medical care. Fully 72% of the project footprint is covered by an accessible green roof and part of a two-acre public garden. The change in grade of the sloping site provides a perfect opportunity to integrate the lower levels of the building with the topography. The large footprint – 110,000 SF dedicated to surgical services – is partially contained beneath the vast network of green spaces accessible to patients, visitors and staff. A patient tower rises from this landscaped plinth and connects to existing adjacent buildings to complete a major public circulation axis extending across the campus. The new facility maximizes daylighting and takes advantage of views of the neighboring public gardens and art museum.

in::sync media recently completed the fly around of the new building under construction.

GW Science and Engineering Hall Achieves LEED Gold

George Washington University’s Science and Engineering Hall (SEH) was awarded LEED Gold by the United States Green Building Council (USCBC). At the start of schematic design GW challenged Ballinger to design SEH without multiplying the University’s carbon footprint. The resulting design is an academic building that is unparalleled at GW in scope and function, as well as eco-friendly. The building’s sustainable strategies were an interdisciplinary collaboration between Ballinger’s architecture and engineering studios. Sustainable strategies include:

Power from a Co-Generation System
The project sponsored the creation of and receives its power from a new co-generation power system that will reduce the building’s carbon footprint by more than half, saving 8,100 metric tons of carbon dioxide each year.

Enthalpy Wheels
Enthalpy Wheels are incorporated into all air handling units for the building. This technology recycles the once wasted energy from the exhausted air of the building in order to heat or cool incoming air, reducing energy needs. The savings are expected to pay for the system in less than three years.

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Chilled Beams
Chilled Beams, suspended from the ceiling, are utilized throughout the project and use water to cool the air more efficiently than a conventional air-conditioning system.

Green Roof
Vegetation covers more than 10,000 SF of the roof, keeping the building cool by absorbing heat from the sun while also reducing rainwater runoff. The remaining upper roof area is a light-colored, high albedo roof to further maximize heat reflectance. Rain from the roof areas drains into a 42,000-gallon cistern where it is filtered and then used to flush toilets, saving roughly 850,000 gallons of water per year.

Rutgers Dedicates New Jersey Institute for Food, Nutrition & Health


A dedication ceremony for the New Jersey Institute for Food, Nutrition & Health took place Tuesday. The IFNH is a signature initiative by Rutgers University to provide research and education related to society’s pressing challenges in cardio-inflammatory disease, cancer and obesity.

The Ballinger-designed interdisciplinary research building is the centerpiece of the Institute. The iconic building is transparent to nature, inviting faculty, students and the community to engage in the nutrition and health activities housed within. A large solar “parasol” becomes the organizing feature of the design.

New Jersey Institute for Food Nutrition & Health at Rutgers College: New Brunswick, NJ, Architect: Ballinger Architects

The building features a student health clinic, a human performance lab, a nutrition research clinic, a healthy eating courtyard, and a preschool dedicated to educating parents and children on diet and nutrition. The remaining spaces house wet and dry labs, faculty and administrative offices, and outreach meeting spaces.

Ceremony attendees included New Jersey Lieutenant Governor Kim Guadagno, Rutgers president Dr. Robert Barchi, the Institute’s Director Dr. Peter Gillies, and Ballinger’s own Jeff French and Craig Spangler, among others.

Ballinger wins the 2015 IIDA “Best of Year” Award

From a pool of 38 projects submitted by 18 firms, Ballinger won the 2015 IIDA “Best of Year” Award for its interior design work on the George Washington University Science & Engineering Hall.  The award recognizes outstanding built work designed by IIDA members in PA, NJ and DE.

The new 500,000 sf, eight-story Science & Engineering Hall (SEH) is the focal point of George Washington University’s expanding research emphasis, and transforms the institution’s capabilities in the sciences.

The IIDA award judges highlighted the dynamic, integrated experiences of SEH’s architecture and interiors topped off by great accents of color and moments of surprise.

Transparency is a pervasive theme – a glass façade on the building exterior, glass fronts on all labs and offices, a double-height atrium space to open vertical sightlines, and a floating tower of teaching spaces that extends six floors up.  The abundance of glass allows natural light to penetrate the large floorplate while putting science on display both internally and externally.

To encourage interdisciplinary partnerships, departments are arranged in “research neighborhoods” that place lab and office space for different disciplines next to each other around a collaboration space, pantry, and spiral stair.  Gathering spaces can be found throughout the building: internal garden spaces highlighted by green walls, informal group spaces, a large commons area, meeting and study rooms.

The building’s neutral palette is accented with pops of color to energize the space and assist in wayfinding.  The maple underside of the teaching tower brings warmth to the scale of the atrium.  The continuous flow of materials – terrazzo, granite, concrete and maple – from the common spaces into the teaching and research spaces provides a gradual transition and allows the science happening in the building to play the central role.