Articles Tagged with: Academic Design
Engineering for a New World

The University of Rhode Island Magazine covered the opening of the Fascitelli Center for Advanced Engineering, designed and engineered by Ballinger.

Fall 2019 Magazine Cover

Excerpted from the University of Rhode Island Magazine:

The largest construction project in University history, The Fascitelli Center for Advanced Engineering opened its doors this fall, bringing all the engineering disciplines together in a space that actively supports hands-on, interdisciplinary research and defies departmental silos. The center features state-of-the-art research labs, student-oriented open space, and bold, modern design–transparent, airy, and centered around common work areas.

By Janine Liberty

From the smartphone to the Large Hadron Collider to France’s Millau Viaduct, some of the world’s greatest engineering marvels have been created in the last 20 years. Rapid advances in technology and material sciences have changed not just what’s possible in engineering, but what’s imaginable. Engineers are at the center of an era defined by unprecedented technological capabilities, and their creative and practical achievements are shaping the world in entirely new ways.

Collective Purpose

Just before classes began this fall, a group of engineering professors gathered in The Fascitelli Center for Advanced Engineering. Representing the full engineering faculty, this group comprises 22 of the college’s 74 faculty members, whose research and teaching will be shaped by the open space, transparent walls, and bridge-like architecture of the new facility.

Engineers are unique. Equal parts creative visionaries and doers, they are able to imagine technologies that will advance human potential, and construct the framework that will transform their ideas into reality. These engineers are also teachers, mentors, and guides—showing the next generation, who will be faced with some of the biggest problems the world has ever known, how to engineer solutions.

A New Space for a New Era of Research

URI’s College of Engineering is positioned to push the rapidly expanding boundaries of science and technology, and its new home, The Fascitelli Center for Advanced Engineering, is designed for this new era. With the opening of The Fascitelli Center for Advanced Engineering this fall,” says College of Engineering Dean Raymond M. Wright, “students can be educated differently, and researchers can collaborate more easily across disciplines.”

“This new facility will stimulate collaborative, multidisciplinary learning and research. It will lead to discoveries that we cannot even imagine today.”
–URI President David M. Dooley

“Increasingly, our engineering students and faculty are not only working in interdisciplinary teams within the college, but with students and faculty from across the University in oceanography, health, pharmacy, chemistry, computer science, and business as well as companies and corporations around the state, region, and the world,” URI President David M. Dooley says.

During preliminary meetings with the project’s principal architect, Terry Steelman, of the firm Ballinger of Philadelphia, Wright explained that he wanted to bring faculty together through research areas, not departments or disciplines. “One thing we know for sure is when we bring people together to solve challenges, it gets done,” says Wright.

The college will be organized around critical interdisciplinary research themes that address some of the biggest challenges the world faces: alternative energy, nanotechnology, robotics, cybersecurity, water for the world, biomedical technology, advanced materials and structures, and sensors and instrumentation.

The Fascitelli Center will support and encourage this interdisciplinary research by physically locating faculty from different disciplines near one another and adjacent to common research and meeting spaces. “Almost nothing in engineering anymore exists solely within a single discipline,” says Steelman. “This building is designed not just to advocate for, but to stimulate interdisciplinary discovery, so students can be educated differently, and researchers can collaborate across disciplines.”

“When the engineering disciplines combine, the sum is greater than its parts. URI engineering is building the future.”
–Dean Raymond M. Wright

“Our faculty are designing and building the infrastructure modern society relies on; finding innovative ways to harness energy from our sun, ocean, and even highways; building new medical diagnostic methods and devices; and racing to ensure every man, woman, and child has access to clean, safe water,” says Wright.

“This new facility will stimulate collaborative, multidisciplinary learning and research. It will lead to discoveries that we cannot even imagine today,” Dooley adds.

The new building was funded by two Rhode Island voter-approved bond issues, as well as private gift commitments from corporations including Toray Plastics (America), Inc.; FM Global; Taco; Hexagon; and Shimadzu; and from individual donors, including a $10 million gift from College of Engineering alumnus Michael D. Fascitelli ‘78, Hon. ‘08, and his wife, Elizabeth Fascitelli.

Learning Through Hands-On Research and Fieldwork

Working in robotics is like the Wild West in terms of the opportunities it presents,” says engineering student Robin Hall ‘20. “It’s always innovative, always changing, and there is always something new to work on.” Hall sits in the Intelligent Control and Robotics Lab surrounded by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), robots, spare wires, and computers.

Situated on the fourth floor of the new engineering building, the robotics lab opens up to an expanse of glass that encloses the exterior hallway. From inside, you can look out over the northern edge of the Kingston Campus to the woodlands beyond. Hawks soar above the distant treetops, in effortless flight, while research teams inside devise robotic systems capable of agile, aerial movement.

“Working in robotics is like the Wild West in terms of the opportunities it presents.”
–Robin Hall ’20

This year, Hall has an independent research grant to develop a wall-traversing drone. “My idea employs a four-propeller UAV surrounded by an external cage that can rotate independently from the internal body of the robot. The cage will protect the vehicle and maintain stability.” Working with existing drone and cage designs, Hall’s innovation is to fix two axes and add a motor to the third axis to control the movement. “The quadcopter will behave like a wheel, rolling laterally against a wall surface.”

He’ll work with Paolo Stegagno, assistant professor of electrical, computer, and biomedical engineering, as his grant adviser. “As he designs and tests his UAV, Robin will gain advanced knowledge of control systems,” says Stegagno.

More research involvement–such as Hall’s–at the undergraduate level is important to the college; it means higher-quality senior projects, better internships, and more opportunities for students at all levels to learn from one another. Senior capstone projects are team-oriented and industry-driven, focusing on real-world challenges companies bring in for senior-year students to work on over the course of the academic year.

Making the capstone projects highly visible is meant not only to benefit students, but to attract industry. The projects are already an important point of entry for industry partners, having reliably translated to employment for graduates as well as research and economic partnerships with the University.

College of Engineering alumnus W. Lewis Collier, M.S. ‘86, Ph.D. ‘14, rapid engineering and prototype systems engineering manager for the MIL Corporation, and former technical director at Navmar Applied Sciences Corporation, supervised URI engineering students doing capstone projects at SRI International. He says URI’s capstone program “offers a valuable opportunity for students to apply and hone their engineering skills and learn about real-world problems and how engineers operate in the field.” Adds Collier, the program “is also important to the University’s mission to provide educated workers for Rhode Island businesses.”

A New Space for a New Era of Research

Great design is achieved through a balance of opposites. This 190,000-square-foot, five-story engineering building is a tour de force of design.

During the day, light streams throughout the enormous expanses of open space, constantly shifting in color, shadow, and intensity as it passes through surfaces of varying opacity. This effect is balanced by the density and stability of the building’s metal truss support system–which eliminates the need for interior support columns and allows for uninterrupted, open interiors–and sleek concrete floors.

“The glass of the building is both a metaphor and a physical manifestation of transparency and collaboration.”
—Dean Raymond M. Wright

The trusses, which span more than 150 feet of open space inside and are visible from the exterior of the building, are like those used for bridges, giving the building a bridge-like appearance, which emphasizes its physical siting between the older, humanities-focused buildings in the center of the Kingston Campus and the newer, science and technology-focused buildings on the north edge of campus.

In the new building, capstones will be a significant and highly visible part of the activity. More importantly, points out Wright, students from different research themes will be working in the same space. “You’ll have civil engineering and mechanical and biomedical capstone projects happening side by side.” In the building’s design, the Ballinger team combined the majority of the teaching environments on the first floors, so that students will be exposed to the interdisciplinary nature of the building.

“The quad level is a remarkable place,” says Wright. “We want our students to recognize that it’s their home. There are no faculty offices or research offices on that floor. It’s all about showcasing the hands-on aspects of engineering and building a creative atmosphere for students.”

Great architecture must also balance the experience of the individual with a collective purpose. Fascitelli credits Wright’s vision of bringing the college’s departments together as the driving force behind the building design. “Science as a whole has become so much more interactive, and the world is changing at such a rapid pace,” says Fascitelli. “You really need that cooperation between disciplines.”

Says Wright, “The glass of the building is both a metaphor and a physical manifestation of transparency and collaboration.”

“There’s nothing like this building in our portfolio. It’s unique to URI and I’m really proud of that,” says Steelman, adding that the center is “one of the most provocative and technologically advanced engineering buildings in the country.”

Hall is inspired by the new engineering space. “Being able to work in this space is an amazing upgrade,” he says. “It’s like a temple. It feels like you have the opportunity to do anything here.”

Adelphi Nexus Building Wins 2019 Honor Award

Ballinger’s design for the Adelphi University Nexus Building was awarded the 2019 AIA Pennsylvania Honor Award. Winners were selected based on significant contributions toward a better and more sustainable built environment in the categories of architecture, historic preservation, interior architecture, regional and urban design, and impact design.

The Nexus Building serves at the University’s welcome center and houses training and teaching spaces for the School of Nursing as well as innovative learning environments. As the Adelphi campus is an arboretum, landscape and environmental sensitivity were design drivers, and combined with other sustainable features, contributed to LEED Silver certification.

The award ceremony was broadcast live at a variety of viewing parties in the Philadelphia region.

Ballinger Senior Principal Presents Course on Cope and Stewardson

Ballinger Senior Principal William Gustafson, FAIA recently taught a course titled Inspiring Campus Architecture: Bryn Mawr College and the Evolution of Collegiate Gothic. It was presented as part of the Main Line School Night, a local educational initiative that hosts publicly accessible classes covering a wide range of topics on design and the arts.

The course, which included three lectures and a tour of Bryn Mawr College, centered around two Philadelphia architects, Walter Cope and John Stewardson, who gave birth to the Collegiate Gothic movement in architecture. The program analyzed examples of the work of these two architects at institutions such as Bryn Mawr College, Princeton University, Washington University of Saint Louis and the University of Pennsylvania, and examined intersections of history, landscape, architecture and preservation.

Ballinger Leads SCUP Mid-Atlantic tour

Ballinger Senior Principal Craig Spangler, AIA, joined by fellow leaders in college and university planning, lead a tour of Swarthmore College’s newest addition, Maxine Frank Singer ‘52 Hall. The event was part of the Society of College and University Planning (SCUP) Mid-Atlantic Symposium held October 16.

Swarthmore CollegeSwarthmore’s Jan Semler, Director of Capital Planning and Project Management, described the College’s intent to create a collaborative environment that combines the departments of biology, engineering, and psychology and how Ballinger translated that intent into a design. Ballinger provided planning, design and engineering for the 160,000 SF building, which will house expanded, modern space for science research and teaching, including classrooms, laboratories, office space, and indoor and outdoor commons areas.

Ballinger Recognized on List of Top 100 Green Design Firms

Ballinger was recently ranked #44 on Engineering News-Record’s List of Top 100 Green Building Design Firms for 2019. Companies were ranked according to 2018 revenue from projects registered or certified by third-party green building organizations such as the U.S Green Building Council (USGBC). ENR reports on top architectural and engineering design firms and construction companies, as well as projects in the United States and around the world.

At Ballinger we have always felt a professional obligation to incorporate energy efficiency and sustainable design initiatives into our design philosophy. In a world of increasingly valuable and constrained resources, Ballinger’s design process considers initial construction costs, flexibility for future changes, as well as energy and other annual operating costs. Our firm seeks to integrate the latest proven technology with exceptional design.

Link to ENR’s List of Top 100 Green Buildings Design Firms of 2019

University of Rhode Island Features Ballinger Project

The Ballinger-planned, designed, and engineered Fascitelli Center for Advanced Engineering officially opened its doors in October 2019. It’s one of the most technologically advanced facilities in the country, featuring flexible spaces for interdisciplinary collaboration, and equipment essential to forward-looking research.

Excerpted from the University of Rhode Island’s Features:

Light streams through the walls of glass and into the enormous expanses of open space in the new 190,000-square-foot, six-story Fascitelli Center for Advanced Engineering, which officially opened on Monday, Oct. 7.

All of that open, light-filled space is the centerpiece of the building’s design, which University leaders saw as a way to enhance collaboration among faculty and students across all engineering disciplines.

The celebration marked a momentous day in URI history and a way to thank Rhode Islanders for their support of bond issues totaling $150 million to construct the Fascitelli Center and to expand and renovate Bliss Hall, the historic home of engineering at the University.

Michael D. Fascitelli, a 1978 graduate of the College of Engineering and a 2008 honorary degree recipient, and Elizabeth C. Fascitelli, made a $10 million gift in July to benefit the engineering college. Fascitelli credits Dean Raymond Wright’s vision of bringing the College’s departments together as the driving force behind the building design. “Science as a whole has become so much more interactive and the world is changing at such a rapid pace,” said Fascitelli. “You really need that cooperation between disciplines.”

The Fascitelli Center and the improved and expanded Bliss Hall, which first opened in 1928, will strengthen the College of Engineering’s leadership in the areas of clean energy, nanotechnology to robotics, cybersecurity, water for the world, biomedical technology, smart cities, and sensors and instrumentation.

“With the opening of The Fascitelli Center and Bliss Hall, students can be educated differently, and researchers can collaborate more easily across disciplines,” Dean Wright said. “This building is designed not just to advocate for, but to stimulate interdisciplinary connections and discovery.”

A. James Clark Hall Named a 2019 “Pupil Pleasing Design”

World Architecture News (WAN) recently named Ballinger project A. James Clark Hall to their list of “Pupil Pleasing Designs” in the education category for 2019.

Clark Hall

The 184,000 SF flagship building for the University of Maryland’s School of Engineering was recognized by WAN for fostering broad interdisciplinary convergence in a dynamic innovation environment.

World Architecture News is the editorial home of the WAN awards, an annual program that showcases projects from around the world and provides a forum to celebrate design excellence.

Full List of the 2019 Pupil Pleasing Designs

Swarthmore’s Singer Hall Named in Honor of Scientist Alumna

Swarthmore College’s new biology, engineering and psychology building, currently under construction, will be named Maxine Frank Singer ’52 Hall, becoming one of the first science buildings named for a woman on an American college campus.

Swarthmore CollegeAfter graduating from Swarthmore in 1952, Maxine Frank Singer earned a PhD in biochemistry from Yale University and went on to make significant scientific breakthroughs, including helping to decipher the human genetic code. In addition to conducting research and serving as a science administrator, she helped formulate the National Institutes of Health’s guidelines about how research in genetic engineering should be carried out.

The naming in Singer’s honor was proposed by the family of Eugene Lang, who donated $50 million to the building project.

Ballinger led the planning, design and engineering for the 160,000 SF interdisciplinary hub, which will promote synergies between engineering and other academic disciplines. The building will include classrooms, laboratories, office space, and indoor and outdoor commons.

Link to details: Swarthmore College Maxine Frank Singer ’52 Hall

Ballinger Senior Principals Craig Spangler and Terry Steelman Present at Tradeline

The “Engineer of the Future” must be creative, entrepreneurial, and adaptable. Engineering is increasingly focused on application of scientific discoveries to solve real-world issues, a dynamic that requires a “next generation” of engineering facilities capable of supporting these interdisciplinary convergent trends.

Ballinger Senior Principals Craig S. Spangler, AIA and Terry D. Steelman, FAIA explored this topic at the 2017 Tradeline Conference on College and University Science and Engineering Facilities. Their talk, titled “Next Generation Engineering Facilities: Features That Support a New Skill Set for the ‘Engineer of the Future,’” described how new models for teaching and research facilities can support future engineers.

The presentation featured case studies of Ballinger’s work on the campuses of the University of Rhode Island, George Washington University and the University of Maryland.

University of Maryland A. James Clark Hall Dedication

Ballinger attended the dedication for  A. James Clark Hall, a transformative bioengineering hub at the University of Maryland, College Park. The 184,000 SF building was designed by Ballinger to facilitate world class research and support Maryland’s growing population of engineering students. It will serve as a home for the Fischell Department of Bioengineering, the Robert E. Fischell Institute for Biomedical Devices and shared instructional space for the A. James Clark School of Engineering. This unique integration of education, discovery and entrepreneurship enhances the student experience and facilitates the translation of research from the lab to the marketplace.

In addition to a tour for media, the dedication program included remarks from Maryland Governor Larry Hogan; Wallace D. Loh, President of the University of Maryland;  Robert L. Caret, Chancellor of the University System of Maryland; Thomas V. Mike Miller, Jr., Maryland Senate President;  Maggie McIntosh, Chair of the Appropriations Committee, Maryland House of Delegates; Courtney Clark Pastrick, Board Chair of the A. James & Alice B. Clark Foundation; and Darryll Pines, Dean of the A. James Clark School of Engineering at the University of Maryland.

The Ballinger architects, engineers and designers who led the project and were in attendance at the ceremony included: Principal-in-Charge William R. Gustafson, FAIA; Design Principal Craig S. Spangler, AIA; Engineering Principal Jonathan Friedan, PE; Project Manager Steve Wittry, AIA; Ben Patane, AIA and Nicholas Hollot, AIA.  “The building is a very unique campus place that we hope will inspire excellence in engineering learning, discovery and entrepreneurship for many generations to come,” said Spangler.

Left to right: Steve Wittry, AIA; Nicholas Hollot, AIA; Ben Patane, AIA; William R. Gustafson, FAIA; Arshad Mughal, University of Maryland Associate Director of Capital Budgeting; Daniel Pierce, Assistant Director, University of Maryland Design and Construction; Craig S. Spangler, AIA

Left to right: Steve Wittry, AIA; Nicholas Hollot, AIA; Ben Patane, AIA; William R. Gustafson, FAIA; Arshad Mughal, University of Maryland Associate Director of Capital Budgeting; Daniel Pierce, Assistant Director, University of Maryland Design and Construction; Craig S. Spangler, AIA

Johns Hopkins University’s Undergraduate Teaching Labs wins 2017 Go Beyond Award from I2SL

The Undergraduate Teaching Labs at Johns Hopkins University won a “Go Beyond” Award at the 2017 International Institute for Sustainable Laboratories (I2SL) Annual Conference. The Go Beyond awards honor organizations, individuals, products, and projects that are advancing sustainable, high-performance facilities. The project was recognized during a ceremony October 16 in Boston.

Tradeline Features UM’s Taubman Health Sciences Library

Tradeline recently published a report entitled, “Transformation to Exclusively Digital Library Frees Up Space for UMichigan Medical School,” highlighting Ballinger’s design for the A. Alfred Taubman Health Sciences Library at the University of Michigan. The report describes how this 137,000SF addition and renovation of the Medical School was originally conceived as an update to the library’s sixth floor lounge before student feedback convinced the school of the need to modernize the entire facility.

Ballinger’s Team, led by Principal Todd Drake, collaborated with the school as they renovated their curriculum in tandem with the building design process. The result is a state-of-the art completely digital library and study space that embraces the future of medical scholarship. With the University’s print collection now located off-site, the design team had the flexibility to maximize active clinical learning spaces and provide well-lit and comfortable spaces for quiet study and relaxation.

Read the report.

Ballinger Designed Natural Sciences and Health Building Breaks Ground at Berea College

(Image Above – Berea College President Lyle Roelofs second to the left, Ballinger Principal Jeff French far right)

On Thursday, April 21st, Berea College broke ground on the Ballinger-designed Natural Sciences and Health Building.

At the ceremony, Berea College President Lyle Roelofs stated about the building, “This new 125,000 square foot building will provide an interdisciplinary learning environment, space for enhanced collaboration among disciplines such as biology, chemistry, and Berea’s well-known nursing program, the oldest college-affiliated nursing program west of the Allegheny Mountains.”

Upon approaching the Berea campus from the north, the new building provides a landmark presence blending a contextual Georgian exterior character with a daylight-infused, transparent, contemporary interior environment of flexible pedagogy.

14021_00_N12_web

To read more about Berea’s Natural Sciences and Health Building, click here.

For more renderings of the building, click here.

Ballinger Wins Wintergreen Award

The Undergraduate Teaching Laboratories project at the Johns Hopkins University won a Wintergreen Award in the Education Category. The Wintergreen Awards celebrate, promote and recognize excellence in high performance, healthy design and building; environmental stewardship and community impact; and serve to highlight the green building initiatives and achievements of the USGBC Maryland region.

Rutgers Dedicates New Jersey Institute for Food, Nutrition & Health


A dedication ceremony for the New Jersey Institute for Food, Nutrition & Health took place Tuesday. The IFNH is a signature initiative by Rutgers University to provide research and education related to society’s pressing challenges in cardio-inflammatory disease, cancer and obesity.

The Ballinger-designed interdisciplinary research building is the centerpiece of the Institute. The iconic building is transparent to nature, inviting faculty, students and the community to engage in the nutrition and health activities housed within. A large solar “parasol” becomes the organizing feature of the design.

New Jersey Institute for Food Nutrition & Health at Rutgers College: New Brunswick, NJ, Architect: Ballinger Architects

The building features a student health clinic, a human performance lab, a nutrition research clinic, a healthy eating courtyard, and a preschool dedicated to educating parents and children on diet and nutrition. The remaining spaces house wet and dry labs, faculty and administrative offices, and outreach meeting spaces.

Ceremony attendees included New Jersey Lieutenant Governor Kim Guadagno, Rutgers president Dr. Robert Barchi, the Institute’s Director Dr. Peter Gillies, and Ballinger’s own Jeff French and Craig Spangler, among others.

Ballinger’s Johns Hopkins University Undergraduate Teaching Labs wins AIA PA Award

Ballinger’s addition and renovation of the Johns Hopkins University Undergraduate Teaching Labs received an Honor Award at Thursday’s AIA Pennsylvania Design Awards Gala. The 2015 Architectural Excellence Design Awards celebrate exceptional architecture and design.

Light-filled and open, the Undergraduate Teaching Labs put interdisciplinary learning on display. Ballinger designed the active learning and research facility for Johns Hopkins University’s biology, chemistry, neuroscience and biophysics departments.

 

Ballinger at Design on the Delaware

Principal Terry Steelman was invited to present Ballinger’s award-winning project, the Adelphi University Nexus Building, at Design on the Delaware yesterday. Design on the Delaware is a conference Terry initiated during his tenure as president of the AIA Philadelphia Chapter. At yesterday’s talk, Terry discussed the design of the Nexus Center, a new building that will combine training and teaching space for Adelphi’s School of Nursing with learning environments and resources for the wider campus community. The project was awarded the AIA Philadelphia 2014 Silver Medal.

Ballinger and GW Lead Tradeline Session on Effective Interdisciplinary Facilities

Ballinger Principal Craig S. Spangler, AIA and Associate Principal Rob W. Voss, AIA, LEED BD+C joined George Washington University’s Dr. Can Korman on stage at Tradeline’s 27th annual College and University Science Facilities Conference. Their talk, titled “Mixing Bowls for Science and Engineering: Recipes and Ingredients For Inspiring Interdisciplinary Learning and Discovery Environments,” compared four academic building designs.

By exploring how openness and transparency relate to cost, code, culture and program, Ballinger provided attendees with tools and metrics for planning future interdisciplinary learning environments.

Tradeline is an industry resource that presents high level conferences focused on the latest planning, design, operations and financial thinking for the built environment. This year’s College and University Science Facilities conference was held in Boston, MA.

Link to Presentation

Ballinger Helps Academic Medical Centers Move Beyond State-of-the-Art to Anticipate the Road Ahead

In the Sept-Oct 2015 issue of Medical Construction and Design, Ballinger Principal Louis Meilink Jr., AIA, ACHA, ACHE, discusses the future of Academic Medical Centers (AMC).  AMCs account for 6 percent of care providers, but contribute 20 percent of all hospital care and 40 percent of the uncompensated charity care in the US.  With a disproportionately large market share, AMCs are the first to feel the impact of regulatory and market pressures.  To neutralize pressures without sacrificing mission or quality of care, AMCs must identify strategies to ensure regenerative institutional growth.  Forward-thinking planning and design can contribute directly to the agility of these institutions.

Link to Full Article

A Library for Medical Education and the Digital Age

A ceremony marking the re-opening of the A. Alfred Taubman Health Sciences Library (THSL) at the University of Michigan took place Wednesday 9/16 in Ann Arbor. Once home to over 500,000 books and journals, the THSL is now a technologically-advanced learning space with simulation suites, classrooms, collaboration labs, and study areas. Ballinger led the Medical School through a comprehensive project formation and benchmarking effort to determine the most effective design for a 21st century library space. The resulting 137,000 SF addition and renovation transformed the building into a light-filled, flexible facility that promotes collaboration and hands-on learning. In addition to programming, Ballinger served as the design architect and worked closely with local architect of record TMP Architecture.

Ballinger Presents Post-Occupancy Data at Tradeline

Ballinger Principal Jonathan Friedan, PE, LEED AP and Associate Principal Stephen M. Bartlett, AIA, LEED AP presented a talk at Tradeline Research Facilities 2015 in St. Petersburg, Florida. The session, titled “Post-Occupancy: Lab Functionality, Flexibility, Energy,” reviewed post-occupancy findings from three high profile science facilities at Johns Hopkins University, the Wistar Institute, and the University of Pittsburgh.

They presented data on modeled-vs-actual building performance, real-world use of interchangeable features, amenities for collaboration and interaction, and operating details. The presenters explained how end-user feedback can inform decisions on next-generation research facilities to maximize return on investment.

Link to Presentation

A World of Research Under One Roof

The opening of the new Science and Engineering Hall is the cover story of the Winter 2015 edition of GW Magazine. “It’s an impressive building in an impressive location,” says Dr. Can Korman, Associate Dean of Research and Graduate Studies and Professor at GW’s School for Engineering and Applied Science.

Chemistry professor Susan Gillmor described the experience of students working in the new building, “Instead of this being a drag that you have to go to lab for four hours, you are going into a lab that inspires you, a lab where you want to learn.”

Completed in 2014, Science and Engineering Hall is the largest academic building of its kind in Washington, DC and the first new major laboratory building on the campus in over 50 years.

Link to Magazine

Ballinger Wins Two Philadelphia AIA Awards

Two Ballinger projects were honored with Design Awards from the Philadelphia Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. The awards program recognizes the best in architectural design among AIA Philadelphia members.

Ballinger’s Undergraduate Teaching Labs at Johns Hopkins University received an Honor Award. Light-filled and open, the four-story building accommodates a variety of teaching methods and learning styles, and its flexible and open layout enables cross-disciplinary learning and research opportunities.

The Nexus Building at Adelphi University received a Silver Award, the highest honor in the Unbuilt category. Ballinger provided architecture, planning, interior design and engineering services for this innovative learning environment prominently located at the entrance to Adelphi’s campus.

Ballinger Senior Principals Lead Tradeline Session on Adaptive Reuse

How are leading academic medical and allied health organizations weathering the storm of healthcare reform, performance-based hospital reimbursement, and declining NIH funding? Ballinger principals addressed this question at the 2014 Tradeline Facility Strategies for Academic Medicine and Allied Health Conference.

Senior Principals Jeff French, FAIA, Louis Meilink, Jr., AIA, ACHE, ACHA and Todd Drake, AIA, LEED AP led a session titled “Patients, Procedures, + Pedagogy: Retooling Facilities for a Very Different Healthcare Future.” In it they described how organizations are adapting facilities across the research, training, and care continuum to maximize the value of existing space, particularly in response to changes in patient physical location.

Based on Ballinger’s expansive healthcare and academic portfolio, they provided insight into how institutions can adapt new and existing spaces to a broader functional spectrum, determine candidacy for facility adaptability or renewal, and evaluate facilty needs.

Tradeline is an industry resource that presents high level conferences focused on the latest planning, design, operations and financial thinking for the built environment. This year’s Facility Strategies for Academic Medicine and Allied Health Conference was held in Boston.

Link to Presentation

The New Research Facility Value Metrics: Interaction, Sustainability, Project Quality

At the 2013 Tradeline International Conference on Research Facilities, Principals Bill Gustafson, FAIA, Jonathan, PE, LEED AP, and Associate Principal Steve Bartlett, AIA, presented on emerging performance metrics for science and engineering research. An overview of the presentation is as follows:

Building performance measures have been slowly evolving. Efforts to modify these metrics have largely been hidden from view. This talk seeks to fill this intellectual void by exploring three different aspects of building performance:

  • How far can the traditional metrics take us?
  • What should a human factor model of performance be?
  • What are the potentials to go beyond LEED in terms of technology performance.

The premise of this talk is a building performance dashboard that combines these three elements to create a more balanced view of a building. Underlying this model must be post occupancy evaluations that go back to validate the original premises. The 2012 lab of the Year will provide just such a test case.

Link to Presentation

Repurposing Existing Facilities for Modern Science

How can an institution determine whether it makes sense to rejuvenate existing building stock rather than throw it away? Key factors to consider when deciding to renovate, build new, or carry out a hybrid renovation/addition include: building dimensions, systems obsolescence, location on campus, and program fit. In this presentation at the Tradeline College and University Science Facilities conference, Ballinger Principals Jeff French, Jonathan Friedan and Craig Spangler examine new technologies and approaches that are making renovation of academic science facilities a more financially attractive option for institutions facing limited budgets, constrained real estate, and aging buildings with prominent historic legacies.

Read the Article

Repurposing Existing Facilities for Modern Science

At the 2012 Tradeline College and University Science Facilities Conference, Principals Craig Spangler, AIA, Jeff French, FAIA, and Jonathan Friedan, PE, LEED AP explored the challenges associated with making the judgment to invest in an existing facility struggling to retain its functionality.  It is easy to wipe the slate clean and start with a blank piece of paper.  Each Principal approached this from the opposite perspective, working on the fundamental premise that extending the life of a building is the ideal outcome, even if modest additions are key to unlocking success.

Link to Presentation

The Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery named 2012 Lab of the Year

R&D Magazine has bestowed this year’s annual Lab of the Year award upon the Ballinger-designed Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery. This prestigious awards program is an international competition recognizing excellence in laboratory design. Situated at the heart of the University of Wisonsin-Madison campus, this unique 330,000 SF biomedical research facility is home to twin institutes, the private, nonprofit Morgridge Institute for Research and the public Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery. To engage both the local and campus community with the science happening in the building, an unusually large part of the program is dedicated to public activity. A ground floor Town Center serves as a civic science place and a living room for the surrounding science and engineering campus quadrant. The secure research floors located above the public realm embrace the concepts of transparency and openness to promote interaction, collaboration and discovery within the lab environment.

Read More

Ballinger Senior Principals Present Successful Models for Co-Locating Science + Engineering Programs

At Tradeline’s 23rd Annual College and University Science Facilities Conference, Senior Principals Bill Gustafson, FAIA, Craig S. Spangler, AIA, and Jeffrey French, FAIA presented recent trends in science and engineering facilities. They reviewed a series of recent projects that reflect three planning trends: the research / teaching neighborhood, the emphasis on collaborative spaces, and the disappearance of boundaries both physical and psychological. The underlying principles that drive these trends are measurable: higher utilization of space, higher research productivity, and greater emphasis on shared resources, both space and equipment. Ballinger provided university leaders with measurable benchmarks for these complex phenomena.

Tradeline is an industry resource that presents high level conferences focused on the latest planning, design, operations and financial thinking for the built environment. This year’s College and University Science Facilities conference was held in Scottsdale, AZ.

Link to Presentation