Category: Announcements

Penn Medicine Radnor Awarded LEED Gold

Penn Medicine Radnor was certified LEED Gold by the U.S. Green Building Council. Ballinger provided architecture, interior design, and structural engineering services for the 250,000 SF ambulatory care center.

The 4-story facility adheres to Penn Medicine’s commitment to sustainability. Over 250 new trees will be planted with the full development and the surrounding landscape includes four rain gardens and native plants designed for all four seasons. Water management elements are woven naturally throughout the grounds, where they reduce the environmental impact of run-off and create a welcoming environment for visitors and the larger community, as well as for birds, butterflies and other pollinators.

A Year of Discovery at AU’s Hall of Science

American University celebrated the first anniversary of the Hall of Science with a recap of the exciting research within the departments of neuroscience, biology, chemistry, and environmental science. From a water quality monitoring robot to a chemistry-inspired cooking class, the Hall of Science is “a hub of cutting-edge science teaching and research for both undergrad and graduate students.”

Read more about the research happening within the Hall of Science

Interdisciplinary Life Sciences Building Certified LEED Gold

The Interdisciplinary Life Sciences Building (ILSB) at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, recently achieved a LEED Gold rating from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC).

The ILSB provides new opportunities for integrating research, teaching, and learning across departments and colleges in support of the university’s mission of student success and expanding research in areas of strategic importance. Seamless integration of energy-saving features with the architecture of the building separates the ILSB from traditional high-performance buildings. The orientation of the building’s glass façades, chilled beams, a green roof, stormwater management, and an innovative “air share” system that reduces energy consumption all contribute to the building’s sustainability.

With over 40% in projected energy savings as compared to a baseline building, this ILSB demonstrates the university’s commitment to sustainability. The building reduces annual carbon dioxide emissions by 1,255 metric tons per year and decreases water use by 35%. Beyond the positive environmental impact of the facility, the annual energy cost savings of the ILSB, compared to a baseline building, is nearly $300,000.

Interior of the Interdisciplinary Life Sciences Building at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Interior of the Interdisciplinary Life Sciences Building at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County

State of New Jersey Taxation Building Achieves LEED Gold

The State of New Jersey Taxation Building was certified LEED Gold by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). Ballinger provided architecture and MEP/structural engineering services for the 210,000 SF office building located in Trenton, New Jersey.

The building received several perfect scores on categories evaluated in the LEED Scorecard, including Sensitive Land Protection, Light Pollution Reduction, Low-Emitting Materials, and Innovation.

The 8-story Taxation Building is located near the Delaware River waterfront and was designed to welcome visitors and state workers closer to Trenton’s downtown commercial corridor.

New Jersey Economic Development Agency | State of New Jersey Taxation Building illuminated at dusk.
New Jersey Economic Development Agency | State of New Jersey Taxation Building and the Delaware River.

Ballinger Senior Principal Sponsors Interdisciplinary Collaborative Studio at Kansas State University

Committed to furthering the studies of architecture, landscape architecture, and interior design students at his alma mater Kansas State University, Louis A. Meilink Jr., FAIA, FACHA, ACHE, sponsored a semester-long course aimed at establishing real-world experience for students and a healthier community for residents. The studio concept was developed and led by Kendra Kirchmer, IDSA, Assistant Professor of Interior Architecture & Industrial Design.

The course, Interdisciplinary Collaborative Studio, Vital Design: Denver, introduced cross-disciplinary opportunities for students while identifying the ways social determinants impact overall health. Throughout the semester, students were tasked with answering the following questions:

  • What is health and what does it mean to be healthy?
  • How does the built environment impact health through its quality as well as the ways it shapes the behaviors of groups and individuals?
  • How can design prioritize equity, inclusion, increased opportunity, quality-of-life, and good health for all?

Teams used this initial research and analysis to identify and define their project type and scope. The semester-long studio was based on an interdisciplinary and collaborative design structure to engage students within Kansas State University’s College of Architecture, Planning, and Design. The course encouraged group members to participate in all facets of design while utilizing their specific skill set to develop designs that explore strategies and solutions for creating healthier and more equitable cities and neighborhoods.

With the support of Lou, students had the opportunity to travel to Denver to examine their design theories, test their assumptions, and finalize site selection and documentation. Students presented their final projects this week.

Inova Eastern Region Oakville at Potomac Yard breaks ground

The Ballinger | Ennead design team celebrated the Inova Eastern Region Oakville at Potomac Yard groundbreaking on Tuesday, November 16.

Characterized by its sculptural and humanistic design, the soft curving architectural forms of the new medical and emergency facility are welcoming and will engage the urban context and contribute to the redevelopment of Alexandria, Virginia’s Oakville Triangle neighborhood. The new Inova facility is a service of Inova Alexandria Hospital and will include a comprehensive emergency room, imaging services, an Inova Primary Care Center, and medical offices for other Inova and community providers.

The Dr. Ala Stanford Center for Health Equity Opens

The Dr. Ala Stanford Center for Health Equity (ASHE) held a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Wednesday, October 27, and officially opened its doors on Wednesday, November 3. Located in the Deliverance Evangelistic Church on Lehigh Avenue in North Philadelphia, ASHE’s goal is to offer equal healthcare to all, specifically underserved communities in Philadelphia.

The Black Doctors Consortium, founded as The Black Doctors Covid-19 Consortium by Dr. Ala Stanford in April 2020, provides care at the clinic to all patients, infants to adults, and accepts all forms of insurance. “For us, it doesn’t matter what type of insurance you have or don’t have. You’re going to see the same people, you’re going to get the same level of care, and that’s what we plan to deliver for everyone who comes into the door,” Dr. Stanford said.

The primary care clinic includes eight exam rooms and three private behavioral health spaces and will offer a range of services, including adult and pediatric well check-ups, OB/GYN, and phlebotomy labs. A small team from Ballinger, led by Director of Healthcare Planning Christina Grimes, with Jonathan Friedan and Courtney Petrella, donated initial planning and design services for the healthcare facility. The group evaluated the existing layout and mechanical systems and presented design options to Dr. Stanford to create a permanent home for the group within the church.

Learn more about the Ala Stanford Center for Health Equity.

Photo courtesy of The Philadelphia Inquirer (Thomas Hengge, staff photographer).

Grand View Health Expansion Tops Out

Grand View Health celebrated a milestone in the construction of a 190,000 SF expansion in Sellersville, PA. The new six-floor pavilion connects to the existing hospital and will house private patient rooms, technologically advanced operating rooms, and a two-level lobby filled with natural light.

Ballinger provided planning, architecture, engineering, and interior design services for the state-of-the-art facility, designed to prioritize wellness for patients, visitors, and staff. Inspired by its site and the values Grand View Health has upheld since its founding in 1913, the building enables the hospital to expand its clinical services.

Representatives from Grand View Health and the design and construction teams gathered to celebrate the placing of the final steel beam of the structure. The project is scheduled for completion in 2023.

Read more about the topping ceremony here.

Sketch of Grand View Health

Two Years In Flight

October 12th marks the anniversary of the official opening of UMBC’s Interdisciplinary Life Sciences Building. The project includes a public art installation by Volkan Alkanoglu, a designer whose work is focused on the pursuit of novel form through spatial, material, and technological explorations. Installed on three large interior panels and composed of hundreds of unique elements, the piece is titled In Flight.

Hear more about In Flight from Ballinger Principal Steve Bartlett, AIA, LEED AP and artist Volkan Alkanoglu:

Ballinger Scholarship for Equity

Ballinger is proud to sponsor scholarships and mentorships aimed at enhancing access to education in the fields of architecture, interior design and engineering. The goals of the program are to equip students with the skills to succeed in our industry and to develop the pipeline of diverse professionals. The program is a component of Ballinger’s commitment to fighting racism and promoting justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion. Eligible applicants are students who are Black, Indigenous, and other People of Color. The program is designed to support students at several steps in their education, from the first year of college through graduation.

The First Year Scholarship is for students in their first year of college, pursuing a degree in architecture, interior design or engineering. The award includes two Ballinger mentors and an opportunity to shadow a professional in the awardee’s discipline of interest.
Link to eligibility requirements and application

The Transfer Scholarship is for students transferring from a community college or technical school who have been accepted into an accredited program in architecture, interior design or engineering. Recipients will receive a paid internship and two Ballinger mentors.
Link to eligibility requirements and application for architecture and interior design students
Link to eligibility requirements and application for engineering students 

The Final Year Scholarship is for students entering their last year of an accredited program in architecture, interior design or engineering. Recipients will receive a paid internship and two Ballinger mentors.
Link to eligibility requirements and application for architecture and interior design students
Link to eligibility requirements and application for engineering students 

University of Maryland Chemistry Wing 1 Project Breaks Ground

The University of Maryland, College Park broke ground on Ballinger’s New Chemistry Building on Tuesday, August 24. This new 105,000 SF facility will expand the scope of chemical and biomolecular research at the University.


Excerpted from Maryland Today:

The University of Maryland, along with state officials, gathered today to celebrate the groundbreaking of the new Chemistry Building. The 105,000-square-foot research building will expand the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry’s innovations in advanced materials, energy storage, nanoscience, drug discovery and delivery, and quantum chemistry.

“Today, we break ground on a research building that will accelerate innovation for the University of Maryland’s Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry,” said UMD President Darryll J. Pines. “Thanks to investment by the state of Maryland and generous partners, this new facility gives us a competitive edge at a critical time to tackle grand challenges with leading technologies.”

The new building—which will be constructed with funds from the state of Maryland’s capital budget—will feature 34 research labs, two core research facilities and 13,000 square feet of collaboration space. The flexible, climate-controlled research labs can be easily modified to meet any faculty member’s needs.

“This new building will expand our legacy of leadership in the chemical sciences,” said Amitabh Varshney, dean of UMD’s College of Computer, Mathematical, and Natural Sciences. “In this new Chemistry Building, our faculty and students will create nanomaterials for next-generation biosensors, fabrics and batteries; develop biomolecules functionalized to treat human diseases; and explore the chemistry required for quantum devices.”

The grand colloquia and events venue in the new building will provide a place for the department’s 45 faculty members and 600 undergraduate majors and graduate students to interact and engage with experts through lectures, conferences and celebrations. A dozen inviting meeting and huddle rooms were designed for impromptu discussions, research group meetings and thesis defenses.

​​”Together, with my colleagues, we believe that what’s happening here is important,” said Guzzone ’86, M.P.M. ’88. “Lives will be changed… society will be changed because of the work that will be accomplished in the new building.”

Speakers at today’s groundbreaking celebration included Pines, Varshney, Maryland Senator Guy Guzzone and Maryland Delegate Maggie McIntosh. Provost Jennifer King Rice also contributed to the celebration, as did Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Professor and Chair Janice Reutt-Robey, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Professor Amy Mullin, and Chemistry Ph.D. student Matthew Leonard.

The university symbolically broke ground on the new building with a chemistry demonstration. Reutt-Robey poured hot water into a vessel of liquid nitrogen, forming a dense cloud billowing into the air. From behind the cloud, an image of the new Chemistry Building appeared.

“We aim to be a Top 10 chemistry and biochemistry program, and this new building is the physical catalyst necessary to help us achieve that goal,” Reutt-Robey said.

The $116 million building was designed by architectural firm Ballinger and will be constructed by the Whiting-Turner Contracting Company. It is expected to open in 2023.

Architects Declare

Ballinger is among over 300 architecture firms to declare a climate, justice, and biodiversity emergency. Environmental stewardship and energy utilization have always been fundamental to our firm and culture. As signatories, we reaffirm those values.

We’re proud to join Architects Declare in committing to:
• Raising awareness of climate and biodiversity emergencies
• Addressing the disproportionate impact of these crises on disadvantaged communities
• Including life cycle costing, whole-life carbon modeling, and post-occupancy evaluation in our work
• Upgrading existing buildings for extended use
• Advocating for detailed disclosure of material provenance and environmental impact
• Investing in research and technology
• Viewing climate change mitigation, biodiversity protection, and positive social impact as measures of success

Nebraska Celebrates Kiewit Hall Groundbreaking

The University of Nebraska-Lincoln College of Engineering officially broke ground on Kiewit Hall, a 181,500 GSF new engineering building and the largest academic facilities project in the 152-year history of the University. Ballinger, along with partner architect Clark & Enerson, designed the building to be a world-class hub of undergraduate engineering education.

In his remarks at the ceremony, Ballinger senior principal Craig S. Spangler, AIA expressed his enthusiasm for the project. “We’re extraordinarily honored to be selected to join the college in designing this very important initiative for the University of Nebraska,” he said. 

Scheduled to open in 2023, the building will house active-learning classrooms, flexible teaching labs and innovative maker spaces.

Integrating Lean and EBD

Ballinger Senior Healthcare Planner Fernanda Pires was among the presenting faculty of “Transforming Outcomes: Integrating Lean and EBD,” a virtual workshop hosted by The Center for Health Design.

The interactive workshop examined how Lean methods can be informed, complemented, and enhanced by evidence-based design (EBD), including research findings, data collection and analysis. Maximizing value, eliminating waste, and continuous improvement are at the core of Lean, while improving safety and quality is at the core of evidence-based design. Through coaching and simulations, the workshop instructed participants on integrating and applying Lean and EBD principles to future projects.

Bringing the Outside In

Ballinger Senior Principal Louis A. Meilink, Jr., FAIA, FACHA, ACHE and Associate Principal and Director of Healthcare Planning Christina Grimes, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, EDAC, ACHA presented “Bringing the Outside In” at the 2021 European Healthcare Design Congress.

Focused on how nature and salutogenic design can influence clinical environments, the talk included case studies illustrating the concepts of transparency, community and a medical village. Driven by innovation, sustainability, and evidence-based design, the examples demonstrate how modern healthcare designs can serve as anchors within their communities, both as physical campuses and through their lasting community involvement and outreach.

The presentation was part of a session on “Healthy community design and infrastructure,” and was followed by a panel discussion with participants from the Netherlands, United Kingdom and the US.  The European Healthcare Design 2021 Congress, now in its seventh year, is organized by Architects for Health and SALUS Global Knowledge Exchange. The theme of this year’s event was “Creative destruction: Design innovation in the face of existential threats.”

Link to presentation

Ballinger Volunteers with Courtyard Mentor Network

Ballinger architect Peter Elsbeck, AIA, LEED AP BD+C and designer Anastazja Krynska led a workshop for the Courtyard Mentor Network, a newly-formed community organization that introduces young men to career options and aides them in developing healthy relationship skills: essential tools for navigating a successful career.

The event was part of a weekly series supported by the Queen Village Neighbors Association where community members describe occupations, share professional and personal skills they have developed throughout their careers, and the characteristics of the healthy relationships they have formed along the way.

As part of this series, Peter and Ana described the profession of architecture and the training required to become an architect, as well as their roles at Ballinger and the how they do their work. They led an activity in which the boys drew floorplans of their future homes on architectural grid pads.

Learn more about the Courtyard Mentor Network

Drexel University Health Sciences Building Tops Out

The Drexel University Health Sciences Building at Philadelphia’s uCity Square reached a construction milestone, the “topping out” of the structure. The building, designed by Ballinger and developed by Wexford Science + Technology, will enable professional connections and collaboration between Drexel’s College of Nursing and Health Professions, College of Medicine, and the Graduate School. It is designed to solidify Drexel University as an anchor institution in West Philadelphia focused on both innovation and inclusion. The building is scheduled to open in 2022.

Kraus Building Awarded LEED Gold

Ballinger’s Kraus Building Renovation project at the University of Michigan was recently certified Gold by the U.S. Green Building Council.

Excerpted from the University of Michigan:

The School of Kinesiology Building renovation and addition project has earned LEED Gold building certification from the U.S. Green Building Council in recognition of sustainability efforts.

The building, originally constructed in 1915 and formerly called the Edward Henry Kraus Building, includes research labs, a vivarium, classrooms, faculty offices and common space.

The renovation and addition include a number of features that will lead to a predicted energy cost savings of 41 percent, as compared with a code-compliant building per 2007 guidelines from the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers.

Energy-saving facets include:

  • New, well-insulated windows and doors at all exterior locations to provide improved thermal performance. The replacement assemblies have been tested in place to ensure minimal air infiltration.
  • A skylight in a new atrium area to bring natural light deep into the building. Advanced lighting controls, such as daylight dimming, also conserve energy.
  • LED lighting with occupancy sensors throughout the building. Historic fixtures at entrances were retrofitted with LED lamps.

The building also features low-flow plumbing fixtures and automatic sensor faucets, which are predicted to reduce water use by 34 percent compared to Michigan Plumbing Code standards. It also boasts close proximity to basic services and bus transportation.

The project included a 62,700-square-foot infill addition, featuring a three-story atrium and the aforementioned skylight. The addition enclosed the building’s courtyard, thereby reducing the climate cost of using new building materials.

LEED, which stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, is the most widely used green building rating system in the world. It recognizes sustainability efforts to create healthy, highly efficient and cost-saving green buildings on one of four levels: Certified, Silver, Gold and Platinum.

The School of Kinesiology Building renovation and addition earned 62 points from the U.S. Green Business Council, out of 110 possible.

Since 2005, when U-M first received “green building” certifications, 18 projects have earned LEED designations. All new U-M buildings and additions with an estimated construction budget greater than $10 million are required to achieve at least LEED Silver certification.

Link to full article

Penn Stemmler Hall Achieves LEED Gold

Stemmler Hall at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine was certified LEED Gold by the U.S. Green Building Council. Ballinger provided architecture, engineering and lab planning services for this transformative renovation in the heart of campus. An important ambition of the project was to help fulfill the aspirations of Penn’s Climate and Sustainability Action Plan.

Ballinger designed a neutral air chilled beam system with dual heat recovery wheels coupled with demand-controlled ventilation. Calculations project a 50% reduction in energy use and significant annual cost savings. Efficient floorplans enable program and research flexibility, resulting in an open and adaptable 21st century magnet facility with 50% more workstations.

In 2019 Green Building United, Philadelphia’s chapter of the USGBC, recognized the project as a finalist for its Groundbreaker Award program.

Ballinger’s Mike Radio Named Virtual Environment Global User of the Year

Ballinger Associate Principal Michael Radio, PE, CEM, BEMP, LEED AP BD+C was named 2020 Virtual Environment (VE) Global User of the Year. Launched this year by Integrated Environmental Solutions (IES), the competition recognizes innovative use of VE technology.

In his role as Ballinger’s lead energy analyst Mike has employed the IES VE suite to elevate the quality, speed and precision of energy and system load modeling for healthcare and academic clients throughout the country. He uses it to rapidly generate comprehensive scenario and architectural design variation analyses beginning at the earliest stages of planning. He integrates that data with analyses of multiple site infrastructure/central plant options, giving owners the most comprehensive set of data possible upon which to make key capital spending decisions. 

IES Vice President Liam Buckley praised “the analytical range of Mike’s submission. From simple curtainwall assessments, to sizing chilled beams and onto integrating on-site cogeneration with central plants, all coupled with the IESVE VistaPro graphics, demonstrated the highest level of performance modeling excellence. A well-deserved winner.”

As global winner, Mike received a $1,000 prize which he’s donating to the ASHRAE Philadelphia Debra H. Kennoy Scholarship Fund, a fund he helped establish, intended to encourage female college students to pursue studies in engineering.  

Read more about the award

Ballinger Honored with Prestigious AIA Firm of the Year Award

The Pennsylvania chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) honored Ballinger with the 2020 Firm of the Year Award. The annual award recognizes a firm whose passion and practice has produced notable architecture for at least a decade.

The honor was announced during the AIA Pennsylvania Architectural Excellence Awards broadcast on November 19. Ballinger Senior Principal Terry D. Steelman, FAIA described the recognition as “a testimony to our unwavering commitment to quality at every level of practice. It takes a talented team collaborating with great clients to create quality work. We are privileged to have both.”

“We’re guided by our core values of design excellence, environmental stewardship and commitment to community. These values align with those of the AIA and industry professional organizations for which our firm staff associate to remain at the leading edge of our profession,” said Senior Principal Keith C.H. Mock, AIA.   

Ballinger also received the chapter’s EPiC Firm Recognition for support and development of emerging professionals in 2020.

Ballinger Named to Consulting-Specifying Engineer’s 2020 MEP Giants List

Ballinger was named to Consulting-Specifying Engineer’s list of 2020 MEP Giants. The annual list identifies the top mechanical, electrical, plumbing, and fire protection engineering firms in the United States and Canada. The firms recognized by the peer-reviewed publication continuously push boundaries in engineering, providing the top engineered systems in the building industry. Balligner was recognized in the August 2020 issue of Consulting-Specifying Engineer and will be honored at a virtual awards event in October.

NewYork-Presbyterian Alexandra Cohen Hospital for Women and Newborns Opens

The NewYork-Presbyterian Alexandra Cohen Hospital for Women and Newborns, a state-of-the-art facility dedicated to providing individualized care to pregnant women and their newborns, opened August 2.  

Ballinger served as medical architect and healthcare planner for the 246,500 SF hospital, which graces the top six floors of the David H. Koch Center in Manhattan. 

The hospital’s 75 antepartum and postpartum rooms allow every patient to have their own room, promoting privacy, family bonding, and comfort. A Level IV neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)—offering the highest level of critical care for newborns—features private rooms and is the first in New York City with a dedicated MRI and operating room in the NICU. The interior design includes spacious rooms flooded with natural light and artwork created by women. 

“The NewYork-Presbyterian Alexandra Cohen Hospital for Women and Newborns has been designed, first and foremost, as a place for mothers and their babies to receive the highest quality, most personalized level of care available,” said Dr. Steven J. Corwin, president and CEO of NewYork-Presbyterian. “The hospital’s best-in-class model of care combines outstanding care teams, cutting-edge clinical technologies, and a beautiful, nurturing setting that prioritizes our patients’ privacy, safety and comfort.”

The project was designed as a collaboration between HOK and Ballinger.

Maternity Center Offers Privacy and Distancing to All

Local news station NY1 covered the opening of the NewYork-Presbyterian Alexandra Cohen Hospital for Women and Newborns, a 246,500 SF hospital within the David H. Koch Center.

Excerpted from NY1:

Inside the new Alexandra Cohen Hospital for Women and Newborns it’s all about care and comfort.

Dr. Laura Riley offered an exclusive look inside the new facility at New York Presbyterian David H. Koch Center which features 75 all-private antepartum and postpartum rooms which hospital administrators realized would be a benefit to treatment when the pandemic hit as the project neared its completion.

“We realized that this space is going to be even better for us because with the pandemic we needed women to have private rooms,” said Dr. Riley, Chief of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

It’s a feature moms-to-be like Lucy Bai say will provide some peace of mind when she delivers her baby, knowing that social distancing is incorporated into the design.

“I think it’s definitely put me at ease now a little bit more than it did before because we do know a little bit more about this virus” said Bai. “We do know that wearing masks are effective. I’ll be wearing a mask. I know the doctors and nurses will be wearing a mask,” she said.

Families whose babies are being treated in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit will also have their privacy. Riley says everything is state of the art to give mom and baby the best start.

“Having that private space from the time that you come in to the time that you leave I think is really special, it also allows us to really personalize the care” said Riley.

And now with triple the space currently available at the hospital, administrators expect to handle around seven thousand births per year once the center opens on Sunday.

Ballinger Designers Rank in International Portable Museum Design Competition

Instant Museum, a concept by Ballinger designers Philip Claghorn and Ray Lai, made the shortlist of the Archhive Books’ Portable Reading Rooms competition, representing the US on the global list. The international architecture competition invited designers to create a modular book-sharing structure to encourage reading and provide a community space for citizens of all ages.

The Instant Museum concept is a dynamic installation that aims to change the static and exclusive perception of the traditional museum. In contrast, the public is encouraged to ‘play’ with the modular structure. Throughout their concept, the designers prioritized public accessibility. The installation makes classic works of art and architectural literature available in an instant, in communities that may not have easy access to museums.

Archhive Books, the competition sponsor, is a print publication that connects architects with social issues and engagement opportunities.

View the entry

Accelerating Change through Evidence-Based Design

As a Cornerstone partner of the Center for Health Design, Ballinger advances the mission of improving the quality of healthcare through design of the built environment. Ballinger has been an active participant in the Center’s work, including the Pebble Project, a national research initiative to formalize an evidence-based design process. The goal is to create a ripple effect by documenting peer-reviewed examples of healthcare environments that employ evidence-based design and then assess outcomes.

Ballinger participated in the planning of two Pebble Projects: the University of Maryland Medical Center’s Shock Trauma Critical Care Tower and the Weill Greenberg Ambulatory Care Center at Weill Cornell Medicine. The Weill Greenberg Center was one of the nation’s first Pebble Projects, and research on the design impacts was published in the peer-reviewed Health Environments Research + Design (HERD) Journal.

In line with the mission to share knowledge, Ballinger leaders have also presented lectures and webinars at learning sessions organized by Center. We are proud to contribute to the Center’s ultimate goal of improving patient outcomes.

Read more on Ballinger’s partnership with the Center for Health Design

Our Ballinger Community

Recent events have brought heightened focus on eliminating social injustice and providing dignity and respect for human life. Many Americans are protesting for positive change and improving our collective quality of life. We must commit ourselves to being a source of sensitivity and care at this time of uncertainty, as well as advocates for human rights always.

We dedicate ourselves to Ethical and Professional Conduct that binds us professionally to upholding human rights for all and using our knowledge and skill for the enhancement of human welfare. By our own code, it is unethical to adjoin ourselves to the service of those who would ask us to violate those principles.

As Architects, Engineers, and Designers we uphold the safety and well-being of people inhabiting our built environments. We pride ourselves on our expertise and apply our knowledge to solve difficult design and technical challenges. We can extend the same commitment to our craft by bringing innovative ideas and determination to the complex challenges facing our broader society. We can strive to build a more honest, safe, and equitable world.

Since 1878, Ballinger has been an active Philadelphia community leader with broad national reach. Let’s remain focused on a better and more just future… for every member of our local community and across the nation.

The Ballinger Leadership

Philadelphia-Based Researchers Work Towards COVID-19 Vaccine in Ballinger-Designed Labs

Research scientists at the University of Pennsylvania and The Wistar Institute are responding to the coronavirus global outbreak by investigating the development of new ways to diagnose, treat, and prevent infections. Researchers are conducting experiments in labs designed by the architects and engineers of Ballinger — The Robert and Penny Fox Tower, a seven-story, 100,000 SF addition to The Wistar Institute and Stemmler Hall, a 230,000 SF lab building at the University of Pennsylvania that recently underwent a transformative renovation.

Photo courtesy of Norbert Pardi

Photo courtesy of Norbert Pardi

Read more about how these institutions are working to speed the development and testing of a COVID-19 vaccine

AIA AAH Webinar: The Big 5 Healthcare Design Strategies for an Adaptable Future

How can we design healthcare buildings to be flexible in the face of uncertainty? In a webinar hosted by the AIA’s Academy of Architecture for Health (AAH), Ballinger Senior Principal Louis A. Meilink, Jr, FAIA, FACHA, ACHE and Principal Erin Nunes Cooper, AIA, ACHA, LEED AP will address trends in patient-centered care and technology that drive the need for flexibility.

Their presentation, “The Big 5: Healthcare Design Strategies for an Adaptable Future,” will focus on the impact of floor to floor heights, column spacing, fixed vertical elements, targeted zones of flexibility, and resiliency on a healthcare facility’s future adaptability.

Link to registration

Ballinger Aids in Printing Coronavirus Face Shields for Healthcare Workers

In the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, Ballinger has remobilized our Ultimaker 3D printers to produce face shields. Organized by our print partner, BluEdge, the effort will aid healthcare workers in desperate need of personal protective equipment (PPE). Ballinger is proud to join architecture firms across the US to manufacture supplies during this time of need.

Link to BlueEdge’s face shield 3D print farm

Ballinger on the Structural Engineering Channel Podcast

Ballinger Principal and Chief Structural Engineer Angela M. Fante, PE, SECB, LEED AP was a guest on the Structural Engineering Channel, a podcast from the Engineering Management Institute. Co-hosts Mathew Picardal, PE and Alexis Clark, PE interviewed Angie about the structural engineering walking tour of St. Louis she recently developed with support from the Structural Engineering Institute (SEI). Angie researched and recorded the tour as a way to highlight and explain notable engineering achievements.

Listen to the podcast https://engineeringmanagementinstitute.org/tsec-22-structural-engineering-city-walking-tour-app/

A message regarding Ballinger’s response to COVID-19

To our Clients, Collaborators, and Colleagues:

Ballinger remains steadfastly committed to our employees, clients, and colleagues as we navigate the uncertainties brought on by COVID-19.

We have undertaken a number of measures to protect our employees while continuing to meet the expectations of our clients. As of March 16, our teams are working remotely, accessible by phone, email and videoconference. We maintain a robust technology platform that enables us to continue to advance the work of our projects remotely. Our technological infrastructure provides full access to our network and enables teams to collaborate and communicate virtually, ensuring continuity of client service and team integration.

Our practice is focused on work that advances discovery, health and learning. As we confront this global pandemic, Ballinger is committed to doing our part to make a difference and to support those that carry the burden of containing this virus and caring for others.

On behalf of all of us at Ballinger, we encourage you to stay safe and well during this difficult time. Thank you for your continued support and trust.

David H. Koch Center Achieves LEED Gold

The NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch Center was recently certified LEED Gold by the United States Green Building Council (USGBC). It’s the first project in New York City to earn certification and the first in the state to achieve LEED Gold under the more stringent LEED Healthcare rating system.

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The 734,000 GSF state-of-the-art ambulatory facility was designed via a collaboration between Ballinger, HOK, and Pei Cobb Freed & Partners, with Syska Hennessy Group as MEP engineer. Centered around providing a seamless patient-care experience from beginning to end, the facility is also designed for operational efficiency, future flexibility and sustainability.

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Sustainable strategies include a high-performance building skin, high-efficiency mechanical systems and a green roof covering 30% of the surface. Systems are designed to decrease energy use by 18.7% and water usage by 30%. The distinctive façade consists of triple paned insulated glazing with slatted wood screens, which reduces solar glare, building heat gain, and the need for solar and privacy shading.

Engineering for a New World

The University of Rhode Island Magazine covered the opening of the Fascitelli Center for Advanced Engineering, designed and engineered by Ballinger.

Fall 2019 Magazine Cover

Excerpted from the University of Rhode Island Magazine:

The largest construction project in University history, The Fascitelli Center for Advanced Engineering opened its doors this fall, bringing all the engineering disciplines together in a space that actively supports hands-on, interdisciplinary research and defies departmental silos. The center features state-of-the-art research labs, student-oriented open space, and bold, modern design–transparent, airy, and centered around common work areas.

By Janine Liberty

From the smartphone to the Large Hadron Collider to France’s Millau Viaduct, some of the world’s greatest engineering marvels have been created in the last 20 years. Rapid advances in technology and material sciences have changed not just what’s possible in engineering, but what’s imaginable. Engineers are at the center of an era defined by unprecedented technological capabilities, and their creative and practical achievements are shaping the world in entirely new ways.

Collective Purpose

Just before classes began this fall, a group of engineering professors gathered in The Fascitelli Center for Advanced Engineering. Representing the full engineering faculty, this group comprises 22 of the college’s 74 faculty members, whose research and teaching will be shaped by the open space, transparent walls, and bridge-like architecture of the new facility.

Engineers are unique. Equal parts creative visionaries and doers, they are able to imagine technologies that will advance human potential, and construct the framework that will transform their ideas into reality. These engineers are also teachers, mentors, and guides—showing the next generation, who will be faced with some of the biggest problems the world has ever known, how to engineer solutions.

A New Space for a New Era of Research

URI’s College of Engineering is positioned to push the rapidly expanding boundaries of science and technology, and its new home, The Fascitelli Center for Advanced Engineering, is designed for this new era. With the opening of The Fascitelli Center for Advanced Engineering this fall,” says College of Engineering Dean Raymond M. Wright, “students can be educated differently, and researchers can collaborate more easily across disciplines.”

“This new facility will stimulate collaborative, multidisciplinary learning and research. It will lead to discoveries that we cannot even imagine today.”
–URI President David M. Dooley

“Increasingly, our engineering students and faculty are not only working in interdisciplinary teams within the college, but with students and faculty from across the University in oceanography, health, pharmacy, chemistry, computer science, and business as well as companies and corporations around the state, region, and the world,” URI President David M. Dooley says.

During preliminary meetings with the project’s principal architect, Terry Steelman, of the firm Ballinger of Philadelphia, Wright explained that he wanted to bring faculty together through research areas, not departments or disciplines. “One thing we know for sure is when we bring people together to solve challenges, it gets done,” says Wright.

The college will be organized around critical interdisciplinary research themes that address some of the biggest challenges the world faces: alternative energy, nanotechnology, robotics, cybersecurity, water for the world, biomedical technology, advanced materials and structures, and sensors and instrumentation.

The Fascitelli Center will support and encourage this interdisciplinary research by physically locating faculty from different disciplines near one another and adjacent to common research and meeting spaces. “Almost nothing in engineering anymore exists solely within a single discipline,” says Steelman. “This building is designed not just to advocate for, but to stimulate interdisciplinary discovery, so students can be educated differently, and researchers can collaborate across disciplines.”

“When the engineering disciplines combine, the sum is greater than its parts. URI engineering is building the future.”
–Dean Raymond M. Wright

“Our faculty are designing and building the infrastructure modern society relies on; finding innovative ways to harness energy from our sun, ocean, and even highways; building new medical diagnostic methods and devices; and racing to ensure every man, woman, and child has access to clean, safe water,” says Wright.

“This new facility will stimulate collaborative, multidisciplinary learning and research. It will lead to discoveries that we cannot even imagine today,” Dooley adds.

The new building was funded by two Rhode Island voter-approved bond issues, as well as private gift commitments from corporations including Toray Plastics (America), Inc.; FM Global; Taco; Hexagon; and Shimadzu; and from individual donors, including a $10 million gift from College of Engineering alumnus Michael D. Fascitelli ‘78, Hon. ‘08, and his wife, Elizabeth Fascitelli.

Learning Through Hands-On Research and Fieldwork

Working in robotics is like the Wild West in terms of the opportunities it presents,” says engineering student Robin Hall ‘20. “It’s always innovative, always changing, and there is always something new to work on.” Hall sits in the Intelligent Control and Robotics Lab surrounded by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), robots, spare wires, and computers.

Situated on the fourth floor of the new engineering building, the robotics lab opens up to an expanse of glass that encloses the exterior hallway. From inside, you can look out over the northern edge of the Kingston Campus to the woodlands beyond. Hawks soar above the distant treetops, in effortless flight, while research teams inside devise robotic systems capable of agile, aerial movement.

“Working in robotics is like the Wild West in terms of the opportunities it presents.”
–Robin Hall ’20

This year, Hall has an independent research grant to develop a wall-traversing drone. “My idea employs a four-propeller UAV surrounded by an external cage that can rotate independently from the internal body of the robot. The cage will protect the vehicle and maintain stability.” Working with existing drone and cage designs, Hall’s innovation is to fix two axes and add a motor to the third axis to control the movement. “The quadcopter will behave like a wheel, rolling laterally against a wall surface.”

He’ll work with Paolo Stegagno, assistant professor of electrical, computer, and biomedical engineering, as his grant adviser. “As he designs and tests his UAV, Robin will gain advanced knowledge of control systems,” says Stegagno.

More research involvement–such as Hall’s–at the undergraduate level is important to the college; it means higher-quality senior projects, better internships, and more opportunities for students at all levels to learn from one another. Senior capstone projects are team-oriented and industry-driven, focusing on real-world challenges companies bring in for senior-year students to work on over the course of the academic year.

Making the capstone projects highly visible is meant not only to benefit students, but to attract industry. The projects are already an important point of entry for industry partners, having reliably translated to employment for graduates as well as research and economic partnerships with the University.

College of Engineering alumnus W. Lewis Collier, M.S. ‘86, Ph.D. ‘14, rapid engineering and prototype systems engineering manager for the MIL Corporation, and former technical director at Navmar Applied Sciences Corporation, supervised URI engineering students doing capstone projects at SRI International. He says URI’s capstone program “offers a valuable opportunity for students to apply and hone their engineering skills and learn about real-world problems and how engineers operate in the field.” Adds Collier, the program “is also important to the University’s mission to provide educated workers for Rhode Island businesses.”

A New Space for a New Era of Research

Great design is achieved through a balance of opposites. This 190,000-square-foot, five-story engineering building is a tour de force of design.

During the day, light streams throughout the enormous expanses of open space, constantly shifting in color, shadow, and intensity as it passes through surfaces of varying opacity. This effect is balanced by the density and stability of the building’s metal truss support system–which eliminates the need for interior support columns and allows for uninterrupted, open interiors–and sleek concrete floors.

“The glass of the building is both a metaphor and a physical manifestation of transparency and collaboration.”
—Dean Raymond M. Wright

The trusses, which span more than 150 feet of open space inside and are visible from the exterior of the building, are like those used for bridges, giving the building a bridge-like appearance, which emphasizes its physical siting between the older, humanities-focused buildings in the center of the Kingston Campus and the newer, science and technology-focused buildings on the north edge of campus.

In the new building, capstones will be a significant and highly visible part of the activity. More importantly, points out Wright, students from different research themes will be working in the same space. “You’ll have civil engineering and mechanical and biomedical capstone projects happening side by side.” In the building’s design, the Ballinger team combined the majority of the teaching environments on the first floors, so that students will be exposed to the interdisciplinary nature of the building.

“The quad level is a remarkable place,” says Wright. “We want our students to recognize that it’s their home. There are no faculty offices or research offices on that floor. It’s all about showcasing the hands-on aspects of engineering and building a creative atmosphere for students.”

Great architecture must also balance the experience of the individual with a collective purpose. Fascitelli credits Wright’s vision of bringing the college’s departments together as the driving force behind the building design. “Science as a whole has become so much more interactive, and the world is changing at such a rapid pace,” says Fascitelli. “You really need that cooperation between disciplines.”

Says Wright, “The glass of the building is both a metaphor and a physical manifestation of transparency and collaboration.”

“There’s nothing like this building in our portfolio. It’s unique to URI and I’m really proud of that,” says Steelman, adding that the center is “one of the most provocative and technologically advanced engineering buildings in the country.”

Hall is inspired by the new engineering space. “Being able to work in this space is an amazing upgrade,” he says. “It’s like a temple. It feels like you have the opportunity to do anything here.”

Taxation Building Expands Customer Base for Trenton Businesses

News source NJ.com published an article about the economic impact of new office buildings currently in construction in Trenton. The Taxation Building, designed and engineered by Ballinger, will bring state office workers closer to Trenton’s downtown commercial corridor.

The high-rise building, scheduled for completion in 2021, is sheathed in a reflective glass curtainwall to juxtapose and reflect the adjoining concrete and metal Labor Building. The north and south facades are folded to respond to site views to and from the building and the south side opens to a common landscaped plaza.

Link to article

Ballinger to Lead Tour of Penn Medicine Radnor

Ballinger and IMC Construction will conduct a guided tour of Penn Medicine Radnor, organized by AIA Philadelphia’s
Academy of Architecture for Health (AAH) committee.

Penn Medicine Radnor

Ballinger’s Eric Swanson, Christina Grimes and Jason Cole will walk attendees through the new 250,000 SF outpatient facility, scheduled to open later this year. The design prioritizes wellness and sustainability: the building and its attached 1000-car garage wrap around a courtyard garden, bringing natural light and calming views to patients, families, and staff inside.

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The tour will be held today, Friday, February 21, from 4-5pm.

Registration

Penn Medicine Radnor

Celebrating Engineers Week

February 16-22 is Engineers Week, a celebration aimed at engaging students in engineering. As one of the first firms in the country to merge the disciplines of architecture and engineering into a professional practice, we take pride in creating inspiring environments for engineering learning and discovery.

In honor of Engineers Week, we’re profiling the recently completed A. James Clark Hall at the University of Maryland, College Park. Conceived to foster broad interdisciplinary convergence in a dynamic hub for innovation, it brings together students from various engineering and technology disciplines with a common interest in enhancing lives through medical advancement. A Student Innovation Lab serves as the building’s “working commons,” a highly-flexible team-based makerspace for both small and large projects.

An adjacent forum with operable walls hosts classes and serves as a campus-wide events venue.

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Exposed systems throughout the building provide didactic opportunities for the School of Engineering. These functional systems are compositionally orchestrated to be central to the architectural experience.

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“Clark Hall embodies the future of multidisciplinary engineering with human impact,” Darryll J. Pines, dean of the A. James Clark School of Engineering and the next University of Maryland president, said at Clark Hall’s ribbon-cutting. “These state-of-the-art facilities will create the next generation of engineers who will advance human health worldwide, transforming millions of lives.”

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Philadelphia Business Journal Highlights Chester County Hospital Expansion

Senior Reporter John George at the Philadelphia Business Journal recently profiled Chester County Hospital‘s largest expansion in the medical center’s 125-year history, designed by Ballinger and currently in construction.

Excerpted from the Philadelphia Business Journal:

Penn Medicine’s Chester County Hospital is getting ready to debut the first phase of the largest expansion project in the West Chester medical center’s 125-year history.

15065_00_N7_highPatient care at the $300 million, five-story patient tower — which will have 99 private rooms — will begin Jan. 27.

“We’ve been growing rapidly over the past five years and we couldn’t sustain that growth,” said Michael Duncan, the hospital’s president. “We have one wing that is 60 years old. We need more space and bigger operating rooms.”

Admissions at the hospital climbed from 14,890 in 2014 to 16,790 last year. During that same time, emergency department visits increased from 43,240 to 45,161.

With the new addition, Chester County Hospital will grow from 240 licensed beds to 301 licensed beds with all private rooms. The patient tower is expected to add about 50 new jobs at the hospital, which now has 2,482 employees.

The expansion will make the hospital the largest in Chester County, passing Paoli Hospital, which underwent a major expansion in 2009.

Features of the 250,000 square-foot expansion project include:

  • 15 operating room suites, including three high-tech labs for cardiac catheterization and electrophysiology procedures and one hybrid operating room
  • New areas for non-invasive cardiology and pre-procedure testing
  • A rooftop helipad
  • An outpatient pharmacy offering

The project — which boasts an abundance of natural lighting, a courtyard and a green roof — is also creating space for a bistro (serving Starbucks coffee) and enhanced space for the Women’s Auxiliary gift shop in the new Knauer Family Lobby.

A 26,000-square-foot emergency department expansion is scheduled to be completed in the spring.15065_00_N8_high

Chester County Hospital contracted with Philadelphia firm Ballinger for architecture services and hired L.F. Driscoll of Bala Cynwyd as the builder.

Duncan said the hospital’s decision to join the University of Pennsylvania Health System was done in large part to gain better access to the capital markets to fund the project. He said the two organizations also shared similar visions for the hospital’s future growth.

“Penn Medicine was all in with its commitment to Chester County,” said Duncan, noting Chester County Hospital spoke with 17 potential partners before deciding to go with Penn.

Duncan said often when a community hospital aligns with a large health system, the goal is to use the smaller hospitals to gain referrals.

“Penn Medicine’s model is the opposite,” he said. “They are an exporter, bringing their advanced services closer to patients.”

Duncan said the TAVR (transcatheter aortic valve replacement), robotic bypass and bariatric surgery programs that will be part of the new building are examples of that.

Larry Bell, senior project manager for the expansion, said the new patient tower will feature the latest in technology, including 75-inch monitors that will replace whiteboards in patient rooms. He also noted monitors can be found throughout the operating and procedure rooms.

“It will make it easy for a doctor who is consulting with another doctor,” Bell said. “The doctor can be down the hall or up at Penn and they can see what is happening.”

Duncan said some of the technology at West Chester Hospital is being beta-tested in West Chester for use in the $1.5 billion pavilion Penn is building in West Philadelphia.

The last major expansion at the Chester County Hospital occurred in 2014 with the opening of the 93,000-square foot Lasko Tower. That project added 72 rooms for heart patients along with a mother and baby pavilion and an orthopedic/surgical recovery unit.

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Employees Encouraged to B:Well

"B:Well Day" at Ballinger HQ

B:Well Day at Ballinger HQ

Ballinger recently launched B:Well, an initiative dedicated to employee health and wellness. B:Well provides an opportunity for staff members to have fun while supporting each other in making healthy choices. As part of the launch, Ballinger hosted B:Well Day, an internal event with health partner representatives providing nutritional, health and wellness education, as well as giveaways and raffles. Employees will be invited to participate in “The Walker Challenge” in which participants receive a Fitbit fitness tracker to monitor progress and compete against colleagues. The event created awareness about the health and wellness services beyond standard medical visits available to employees, as well as best practices to increase exercise, eat healthy and manage health conditions. B:Well will continue to provide knowledge, support, resources, and incentives for employees to prioritize wellness at work, home, and everywhere  between.

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Ballinger Celebrates Giving Tuesday

Since 2012, Ballinger has been a Corporate Champion of the Community Design Collaborative, a local organization that provides pro bono preliminary design services to nonprofit organizations in greater Philadelphia, creates engaging volunteer opportunities for design professionals, and raises awareness about the importance of design in revitalizing communities.

“We feel a community responsibility to Philadelphia,” says Ballinger Senior Principal Terry D. Steelman, FAIA, LEED AP. In addition to financial support of the Collaborative, Terry has been a strong advocate for the organization, in part for the opportunities it affords volunteers to try out new roles and hone their leadership skills. “In practice, when designers are driven by deadlines and budgets, it’s quite easy to get lost in the daily process. Working with the Community Design Collaborative gives people an opportunity to take leadership roles and grow – and both the Collaborative and community benefit.”

Over 30 Ballinger staff members have volunteered with the Collaborative, on projects ranging from reinvigorating dark intersections beneath a rail viaduct, to expanding a jazz venue, to re-imagining a 1960’s Airstream trailer for community health outreach. Each project was funded by a Community Design Collaborative grant and engaged community stakeholders in the conceptual design process.

This Giving Tuesday Ballinger is proud to continue our support of the Community Design Collaborative and the many organizations that benefit from its work.

Bryn Mawr Project Honored for Construction Excellence

Bryn Mawr Hospital’s new patient pavilion was presented with the General Builder Contractors Association (GBCA) Construction Excellence Award in the healthcare category last evening at the 22nd annual Construction Excellence Awards (CEA).

Ballinger provided MEP engineering services for the project, which was created in response to the Mainline Health System’s need for a market-competitive, contemporary healthcare facility committed to serving its community. Delivering on this need, the facility includes improvements such as private rooms, two medical/surgical telemetry units, an intensive care unit, a high-tech surgical suite, and maternity, labor and delivery, and NICU units. LEED Silver certification, a green roof, an advanced emergency power system, and techniques to reduce long-term ownership costs showcase this project as both resilient and sustainable. Ballinger’s innovative contributions include a reimagined HVAC system that not only satisfies expectations and important healthcare guidelines, but does so while prioritizing sustainability.

Winners were honored at an awards ceremony in Center City Philadelphia on November 21.

Good Food for a Good Cause

Members of B::Engaged, Ballinger’s employee community outreach group, volunteered time last evening to guest-chef at the Chestnut Street Ronald McDonald House in Center City Philadelphia. The organization is dedicated to supporting the families of children experiencing illness by fostering communities of comfort and hope.

At the event, our employee volunteers worked hands-on preparing dinner for families of the Ronald McDonald house by making tacos, hoping to bring joy and a sense of community to the evenings of these families.

Link to the Philadelphia Ronald McDonald House resource page

Adelphi Nexus Building Wins 2019 Honor Award

Ballinger’s design for the Adelphi University Nexus Building was awarded the 2019 AIA Pennsylvania Honor Award. Winners were selected based on significant contributions toward a better and more sustainable built environment in the categories of architecture, historic preservation, interior architecture, regional and urban design, and impact design.

The Nexus Building serves at the University’s welcome center and houses training and teaching spaces for the School of Nursing as well as innovative learning environments. As the Adelphi campus is an arboretum, landscape and environmental sensitivity were design drivers, and combined with other sustainable features, contributed to LEED Silver certification.

The award ceremony was broadcast live at a variety of viewing parties in the Philadelphia region.

Ballinger Announces Promotions

Ballinger is pleased to announce firm-wide promotions. These individuals have distinguished themselves for their leadership, diligence, and creativity in all they do. We thank them for all their contributions and continued dedication to elevating the practice.

To Associate Principal:
William M. Andes, AIA
James Piscopo, PE, LEED AP
M. Sean Pulsifer, AIA, LEED AP
Michael Radio, PE, CEM, BEMP, LEED AP

To Senior Associate:
James Bowman, AIA, LEED AP
Shawn Billiard, RA
Nicole DeMuro, NCIDQ, LEED AP
Peter Elsbeck, AIA, LEED AP BD+C
Jeffrey Harper, AIA, LEED AP
Brad Hubbard, AIA, LEED AP
Christine Larsen
Edward A. Strockbine, Jr., RA, LEED AP

To Associate:
Erin Brobson
Jonathan Channell, PE
Kamille Ditcher, RA
Michael Francois, PE
Travis Elwood
Timothy Hagenbach, PE
Alexa Hansford, AIA
Bonnie Netel, RA
Jason Wiley, PE

Ballinger Senior Principal Louis Meilink Elevated to Fellow

Ballinger Senior Principal Louis A. Meilink, Jr. was recently elevated to Fellow of the American College of Healthcare Architects (ACHA). This distinction is given to ACHA members who have demonstrated an impact in healthcare facility architecture as well as significant leadership in advancing innovation within their practice and beyond.

For over 30 years Lou has led the design of significant healthcare buildings, each informed by the values of his design philosophy: building for wellness, including family as members of the care team, humanizing the hospital, encouraging interdisciplinary collaboration, providing space to support caregivers, and improving safety and satisfaction. Beyond his day-to-day project and firm responsibilities, he is engaged in an ongoing dialogue with healthcare professionals across the globe to increase the evidence base and foster healing through design.

In addition to this distinction, one of the highest honors bestowed upon a member of the ACHA, Lou was also named a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) this year. Lou, as well as Ballinger ACHA inductees Erin Nunes Cooper AIA, ACHA, LEED AP and Christina Grimes, AIA, LEED AP, ACHA, EDAC, will be honored at the College’s Annual Luncheon during the Healthcare Design Conference on November 3 in New Orleans.

Link to the ACHA’s announcement of the 2019 class of fellows:

Ballinger Leads SCUP Mid-Atlantic tour

Ballinger Senior Principal Craig Spangler, AIA, joined by fellow leaders in college and university planning, lead a tour of Swarthmore College’s newest addition, Maxine Frank Singer ‘52 Hall. The event was part of the Society of College and University Planning (SCUP) Mid-Atlantic Symposium held October 16.

Swarthmore CollegeSwarthmore’s Jan Semler, Director of Capital Planning and Project Management, described the College’s intent to create a collaborative environment that combines the departments of biology, engineering, and psychology and how Ballinger translated that intent into a design. Ballinger provided planning, design and engineering for the 160,000 SF building, which will house expanded, modern space for science research and teaching, including classrooms, laboratories, office space, and indoor and outdoor commons areas.

Ballinger’s Erin Nunes Cooper Profiled by Healthcare Design Magazine

Ballinger’s Erin Nunes Cooper, AIA, ACHA, LEED AP was recently named to Healthcare Design’s HCD 10, recognizing contributors to the healthcare design community who have made significant achievements and innovations in the field.

Healthcare Design published in their magazine a full spread on each of this year’s winners. Erin’s profile includes key insights to her industry presence both professionally and personally and includes interesting discussion of her mission statements, biography, year in review, future plans, and more.

HCD 10 award winners across ten categories were recognized at a dinner on September 5, part of the HCD Forum in Asheville, NC, and at the 2019 Healthcare Design Conference in New Orleans.

Link to Erin’s profile in Healthcare Design Magazine

Commerce Secretary on Fascitelli Center: “We Will Power the Economy”

The Providence Journal covered the ribbon cutting ceremony for Ballinger’s Fascitelli Center for Advanced Engineering at the University of Rhode Island. During the event, Rhode Island Secretary of Commerce Stefan Pryor described the importance of engineering in the state, “Rhode Island is a place that engineers and builds things. We have throughout our history, but it’s part of our future as well. It’s a central part of our future. We are thrilled that there’s an engineering school that is of such an outstanding standard. Through this school we will create pipelines of talent that will serve our corporations. We will create great opportunities for our emerging young professional engineers, and we will power the economy.”

Link to article

Ballinger Announces Expanded Firm Leadership

In the spirit of continued firm growth and evolution, Ballinger is proud to expand our leadership. We are delighted to announce seven new Principals and shareholders of the firm.

STEPHEN BARTLETT, AIA, LEED AP
Since joining Ballinger in 1999, Steve has served in a variety of firm leadership roles including Architectural Studio Leader and Senior Project Designer. He has worked in diverse market sectors and collaboratively led the design of some of the firm’s most prestigious commissions. He is a frequent speaker at industry forums across the country and will continue to advance the firm’s design portfolio in higher education.

ERIN NUNES COOPER, AIA, ACHA, LEED AP
Erin joined Ballinger in 2011 and has served as Director of Project Management as well as Senior Project Manager for many of the firm’s most significant healthcare projects.  Erin has been a spokesperson for Ballinger and the healthcare industry in print and on-air forums, and a mentor for women in design. This year she was named to Healthcare Design Magazine’s HCD 10. In her role as Principal, Erin will continue to cultivate the firm’s healthcare practice.

ANGELA M. FANTE, PE, SECB, LEED AP
Angie joined Ballinger in 2000 and emerged as a leader within the firm, first as the Structural Group Manager and now as Chief Structural Engineer.  Her focus on technical expertise, interdisciplinary coordination, and quality control has been key to the successful completion of many complex building and renovation projects. In addition to her engineering leadership, Angie will be expanding her role in client engagement across market sectors.

THOMAS J. PARR, JR., AIA
Tom joined Ballinger in 1997 and has served in leadership roles including Architectural Studio Manager and Senior Project Manager. He has guided diverse healthcare clients through complex renovation and expansion initiatives, orchestrating project teams and facilitating creative design solutions. Tom will continue to manage important client relationships while furthering the expansion and evolution of Ballinger’s healthcare portfolio.

DENNIS POTTER, PE, LEED AP
Since joining Ballinger in 1996, Dennis has become a leader in sustainable systems design, applying his expertise to the corporate, academic and healthcare sectors.  Having served as Director of Engineering, he has cultivated the skills of junior engineers, promoted cross-disciplinary collaboration, and been a champion of flexible, efficient engineering solutions. As Principal, Dennis will be expanding the firm’s engineering portfolio across market sectors.

DAVID MARK RIZ, FAIA, LEED AP BD+C
David joined Ballinger in 2019 as Principal after 20 years with KieranTimberlake, where he led many award-winning projects at colleges and universities across the country. He has been published widely, is a frequent lecturer, and has been a juror for multiple award programs. David will concentrate his efforts in the firm’s higher education sector with particular emphasis on client relationship and design management.

ROB W. VOSS, AIA, LEED AP
Rob joined Ballinger in 1996 and as Associate Principal and Studio Leader has provided leadership through innovation in design and project delivery for some of the firm’s most prestigious academic commissions. His approach to design balances aesthetics and functionality with local context to create enduring solutions. Recognized by clients as a collaborative and engaging leader, Rob will be continuing to advance and expand the firm’s higher education practice.

Learn more at http://www.ballinger.com/leadership/

 

Grand View Health Announces Expansion Plans

Grand View Health recently announced plans for a new 170,000 SF hospital expansion, one of several components of a 5-year, $210,000,000 investment in providing improved access to high-quality, affordable healthcare.

Planned, designed and engineered by Ballinger, the 5-floor hospital expansion will be constructed adjacent to Grand View’s existing hospital in Sellersville, PA. The design prioritizes wellness for patients, family and staff while integrating state-of-the-art technology and enhanced community connections. The design features a new main entrance and light-filled public space, aimed at improving the patient experience while maintaining the culture and values Grand View Health has upheld since its founding in 1913. The expansion will include an integrated procedural platform with operating and interventional rooms, as well as private inpatient rooms, which will enable Grand View Health to offer all private rooms campus-wide.

Currently in schematic design, the project is scheduled for completion in 2023.

Groundbreaking Celebrated on New Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Hospital

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) held a groundbreaking celebration today for a new inpatient hospital in King of Prussia, PA. Ballinger provided architecture, interior design, MEP engineering, and structural engineering services for the 250,000 SF facility, which will significantly expand the services and offerings of CHOP’s current King of Prussia campus. During her remarks, CHOP President and CEO, Madeline Bell, described how the new location will provide convenient access to the highest quality hospital services available.

This new 6-story, 52-room inpatient facility will be the first standalone hospital in the CHOP network not located on the main Philadelphia campus. The facility was specifically designed to offer modern innovation while creating a family-friendly environment. Design features such as open and bright waiting areas, playrooms, ample parking, sun-filled spaces, child life services, and a concierge-like welcome experience bring this intent to life.

Link to groundbreaking photos

Ballinger to present on Healthcare Planning and Design’s “Big Five”

Healthcare buildings of today must be flexible in order to remain relevant tomorrow. How can we design buildings that remain malleable in the face of uncertainty? Ballinger Senior Principal Louis A. Meilink, Jr, FAIA, ACHA, ACHE and Principal Erin Nunes Cooper, AIA, LEED AP will address these concerns at the New York Health Design Insights Networking Event on September 26. The talk, “The Big Five: Healthcare Planning and Design Strategies for an Adaptable Future,” will focus on the impact of floor to floor heights, column spacing, fixed vertical elements, targeted zones of flexibility, and resiliency on a healthcare facility’s future adaptability.

Link to Presentation

Ballinger’s Erin Nunes Cooper named to Healthcare Design’s HCD 10

Ballinger’s Erin Nunes Cooper, AIA, LEED AP was named to Healthcare Design’s prestigious HCD 10. The HCD 10 is a professional awards program that honors members of the healthcare design community who have demonstrated significant recent accomplishments and contributions to the field.

Erin is a Principal and Director of Project Management at Ballinger. She continues to advance Ballinger’s academic medical center portfolio and regularly presents within the office and at healthcare conferences nationwide.

In her project work, Erin is passionate about improving the quality of the built environment and the patient, family, and care team experience. She developed a formal process, in collaboration with the team, for guiding project stakeholders through decision-making using role-playing workshops with 3D printed model pieces. The process continues be a key part of Ballinger’s process for engaging users during design.

Erin’s understanding of the complexity of healthcare projects balances forward thinking design concepts with the realities of clinical requirements and regulatory approvals. She is both strategic and tactical in her leadership and synthesizes complex information to help clients come to informed decisions.

HCD 10 award winners across ten categories will be recognized at a dinner on September 5, part of the HCD Forum in Asheville, NC, and at the 2019 Healthcare Design Conference in New Orleans.

Link to Healthcare Design announcement

Ballinger engineers recognized by ASHRAE

Ballinger engineers were recognized for their commitment to ASHRAE’s mission at the ASHRAE Region III Conference in Norfolk, Virginia. Ballinger senior associate and 2018-2019 ASHRAE Philadelphia Chapter President, Michael Radio, PE, CEM, BEMP, LEED AP BD+C, received the Presidential Award of Excellence. It is awarded for significant improvement in membership, attendance, research promotion, education, chapter programs and technology. Ballinger mechanical engineer Anthony Scaccia, PE won the “Majority Whip” Award for his work as the Grassroots Government Affairs Chair. As Chair, Anthony established and maintained relationships with state, local, and municipal officials with responsibilities related to energy policy.

The Philadelphia Chapter, led by Chapter President Michael Radio and Sustainability Committee Chair Anthony Scaccia, received the Region III Sustainability Award.  This award is given to the chapter most effective during the 2018-2019 period in supporting ASHRAE’s mission to promote a sustainable world.

With more than 57,000 members from over 130 countries, ASHRAE is the leading industry organization representing building system design. Region III includes Philadelphia, Central Pennsylvania, Johnstown, Pittsburgh, Baltimore, Washington, DC, Hampton Roads, Richmond, Lehigh Valley, Roanoke and Anthracite chapters. The Chapters’ Regional Conference was held in Norfolk, Virginia August 15-17.

Stemmler Hall named Groundbreaker Award finalist

The University of Pennsylvania’s Stemmler Hall was named a Green Building United 2019 Groundbreaker Award project finalist. The Groundbreaker Awards recognize and celebrate green building leadership, innovation, and impact in the Philadelphia area.

Ballinger worked with Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine to transform the 230,000 SF Stemmler Hall, a 1970s era biomedical research and teaching facility in the heart of the campus. Ballinger designed  infrastructure to maximize energy performance and floorplans that enable program and research flexibility. The outcome is an open, flexible 21st century magnet facility.

Winners will be announced at the Groundbreaker Awards Ceremony on September 25th at the Comcast Technology Center. Green Building United promotes the development of buildings that are sustainable, healthy for inhabitants, resilient, and cost effective. Through education, advocacy, and strategic initiatives, Green Building United’s mission is to transform the way buildings and communities are designed, built, and operated.

CHOP Roberts Center awarded LEED Gold

The Roberts Center for Pediatric Research at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) was certified LEED Gold by the United States Green Building Council (USGBC). Sustainable features include stormwater management throughout the site, energy-efficient lighting, chilled beams, regenerative drive elevators, and an Indigo bike-share station. A landscaped public plaza provides a place for respite for CHOP employees as well as community members.

William R. Gustafson, FAIA, Retires from Ballinger

For over forty years, Bill Gustafson dedicated his exceptional talent and collaborative leadership style to Ballinger. In July 2019, after a career of great accomplishments, Bill retired from the firm. We are grateful for the many early years that Bill diligently guided Ballinger to a strong collaborative foundation that has led to our current national stature and culture of excellence. We have valued his friendship, mentorship, and partnership and look forward to building upon his legacy.

Bill’s first day at Ballinger was in the summer of 1976 and after the July 4th fireworks, Bill settled in and worked tirelessly to build up Ballinger’s client base, its people, and its reputation for quality design. Now in the firm’s 141st year of practice, up until 1986, Ballinger was led by just two families: the Ballingers (three generations with the last Ballinger retiring in 1973) and the DeMolls (two generations). The DeMolls decided to retire in the mid-1980s, turning the practice over to a group of investors led by Bill. At the time, the firm’s roots were deeply anchored in corporate America with such mainstay clients as IBM, Campbell’s Soup, Sperry-Univac, and Smith Kline.

Under Bill’s leadership, new partners were brought on board, leading to an expansion of market direction and quality design work – in addition to corporate clients, Ballinger’s higher education and healthcare projects flourished. Today, Ballinger’s practice thrives on designing complex technical buildings with sophisticated engineering systems.

Bill was a proponent of well-organized design workshops and a key to his and Ballinger’s success has been the continuation of the Quaker style (consensus) decision-making inherited from the firm’s founding families. He spent an extraordinary amount of timing getting to know people in the office and among clients, for as he says, “if you understand them, you can lead them.”

Bill has received numerous awards, has been widely published, and has been a frequent presenter at forums nationwide. He earned a Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Michigan and his Master of Architecture from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He is a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects.

A teacher at heart, Bill is developing a series of lectures on Cope and Stewardson, the Philadelphia architecture firm (1885-1912) best known for its Collegiate Gothic buildings.

Q&A: Building on a Tradition of Model-Building, Ballinger Launches B:Fab

Ballinger: Fabrication (B:Fab) is a new Ballinger group formed to document and share modeling techniques while elevating the firm’s technical capabilities.

Ballinger summer intern and Syracuse architecture student, Lia Margolis (LM), caught up with Ballinger architect and B:Fab member Raymond Sova (RS) to discuss the group’s formation.

LM: I understand that B:Fab was launched by a few passionate designers and architects and serves as Ballinger’s internal digital fabrication group. Architecture is an art form that relies on drawings and models to communicate meaning. Where does Ballinger fit in to that tradition?

RS: Ballinger prioritizes model-building as a core piece of the design process, and has since before 3D printers, laser-cutters and all of the technology that we now have immediate access to. The office has standards and preferences for building models with a high level of craft and precision. Over the past few decades as we’ve moved into more laser cutting, 3D printing, CNC routing, and other fabrication technology, we’ve learned that more attention and specialized knowledge is required to use and operate the tools effectively.

LM: What led you to form B:Fab?

RS: I share Ballinger’s philosophy that model building is an integral part of the design process. When I was considering working at Ballinger that was something I was drawn to, and I’ve had a lot of experience in model building since I’ve been here. I have been involved in a few interesting models and dabbled in all kinds of fabrication technology. I saw an opportunity to help standardize and share information in a way that is easily accessible to my colleagues and to articulate the level of quality we expect from our models. The B:Fab team is testing and documenting how to achieve the best results from a variety of materials and technologies.

LM: When did B:Fab get started?

RS: The official group is still pretty new but it’s always been here in spirit. We came up with the idea after encountering some challenges while creating a large scale 3D model for a new project. The model turned out great but logistically there were a lot of headaches in getting things assembled property. We conducted a debrief and decided to take a closer look at how to best ensure these kinds of issues don’t reoccur. That led us to form a team of dedicated people who can act as in-house fabrication consultants. The goal is to avoid mistakes we’ve made in the past and ultimately achieve a better result in less time. It’s also an opportunity to experiment and test new ideas and technology.

LM: So you identified a group of skilled people within the firm and centralized resources.

RS: Yes, however the most skilled people in the firm are often the least available because they’re in high demand. What’s nice about these newer technologies is that students know them right out of school. The B:Fab group is generally on the younger side, and we’re readily available as a resources to others.

building

LM: The marketing team is fascinated by the UW-Madison Chemistry façade model. The model is particularly intriguing because the creation process involved both technology and hand-crafting skills. Can you explain how you made it?

RS: That one was a lot of fun! It was an ambitious scale and it definitely played into why I wanted to formalize B:Fab. I built the wood ‘skeleton’ by hand and built structure to support the additional weight and complexity. It’s about 12” by 48” by 44” tall, and weighs about 60 lbs. It required a ton of 3D printing; we used the powder 3D printer and made pretty convincing terra cotta panels with custom extrusion profiles. We utilized the plastic 3D printer for all window mullions and frames. It has a much higher level of detail than a typical model – it was more about actual building components and details rather than traditional massing studies.

LM: Right, it’s way beyond a simple massing concept.

RS: A fun fact about that model is that we’ve also been able to use it for not only presentation purposes, but also for coordination with other architects and engineers. We took detailed photos of the model to convey the design intent to the local architecture firm we’re teaming with. Beyond communicating the design to our client, the model has been valuable in communicating with our team.

LM: Do you think scale models are helpful in the design process? Do you prioritize those?

RS: We use a variety of different scale models and mock-ups at different points throughout the design process. For example, when designing healthcare and lab environments we 3D print furniture and equipment, and bring them with us to user workshops to help clients gain a better understanding of early planning choices. We’ll go to a workshop with a kit of parts and allow users to explore the most efficient use of spaces. Models can be as large as full scale or high fidelity mock-ups. For our healthcare clients we’ll sometimes make mock-ups of headwalls and other elements within a patient room. With a one-to-one scale user groups can interact with the space and experience how it will be arranged. I see potential for models of all sizes/scales to be used for communicating with clients and team members, engaging users, and achieving the best design possible.

models

Margaret A. Cargill Natural Sciences and Health Building at Berea College Awarded LEED Gold

Natual & Health Sciences Building The recently completed Margaret A. Cargill Natural Sciences and Health Building (MAC) at Berea College was awarded LEED Gold certification and Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) Project Certification. Ballinger served as architect and engineer for the highly-visible 125,000 SF new building, designed to prepare students for careers at the intersection of science and health.

Energy consumption in a laboratory is driven by outdoor air requirements, the heating and cooling to condition this air, and high internal heat gains from laboratory equipment. Ballinger designed sustainable systems within MAC to mitigate the energy impact of these drivers. Enthalpy and sensible energy recovery wheels deliver neutral temperature ventilation air. The design decouples ventilation requirements from heating and cooling demands. Active chilled beams provide sensible cooling throughout the building.

The project also received the Forest Stewardship Council’s Full Project Certification. This certification requires a full audit of all wood products used in construction and verification that they were sourced with ecological responsibility. Low-tech horse-logging techniques were used to sustainably harvest timber from ash trees at risk by the invasive Emerald Ash Borer beetle. Once the timber was milled, Berea College Woodcraft students designed and constructed the native-ash panels that now sheathe the building’s atrium. Berea is now home to five of eight FSC certified projects in the US and one of only 85 worldwide.

Ballinger Senior Principal Serves as Jury for Excellence Awards

scupThe Society for College and University Planning (SCUP) Excellence Awards showcase strategic, integrated planning processes resulting in exemplary projects that contribute to institutional success. Ballinger Senior Principal Craig Spangler, AIA served as 2019 Jury Chair for the annual competition, now in its 19th year. This year’s submissions represented 135 institutions, all demonstrating how strategic, integrated planning can result in exemplary building, grounds, institutional success, and careers that inspire.

The jury also included Niraj Dangoria, Associate Dean for Facilities Planning and Management at Stanford University’s School of Medicine, Arthur Frazier, AIA, Director of Facilities Management and Services at Spelman College, Laura Tenny, ASLA, LEED-AP, Senior Campus Planner in the Office of Campus Planning at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and Karen Wolfert, AIA, Senior Architect and Campus Planner at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM). The jury presented entry trends and themes in a session at the SCUP 2019 Annual Conference in Seattle, and celebrated the 29 award winners.

Ballinger engineer brings fresh ideas to professional industry group

Ballinger senior associate Michael Radio, PE, CEM, BEMP, LEED AP served as president of the ASHRAE Philadelphia Chapter for the 2018-2019 term. As president, he increased meeting attendance by 75% by introducing new programming, and varying monthly meeting times and locations. Citing ASHRAE members’ focus on work-life balance, he introduced lunchtime instead of dinnertime meetings. Meeting topics centered around big-picture technology innovations and data usage trends that are revolutionizing the field and he invited a variety of professionals to present, including Dr. Stephanie Taylor, a former physician scientist who consults on safety in healthcare environments, and Gary Fechter, General Manager at UGI Performance Solutions.

Reflecting on the end of his term as president, Mike described his family’s reaction when he told them he would pursue MEP engineering. “When I graduated from Drexel University and decided to enter the MEP consulting field, my mom looked outside at the air conditioning unit and said, ‘That’s what you’re going to be doing for a living?’  I laughed, and explained that the HVAC field is so much more than that. I’m proud that my work as president of the ASHRAE Philadelphia chapter has advanced understanding of our field.”

ASHRAE, the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, is a global society advancing human well-being through sustainable technology for the built environment. Members focus on building systems, energy efficiency, indoor air quality, refrigeration and sustainability within the industry. Several Ballinger staff members serve on the board of governors and ASHRAE Philadelphia committees.

NewYork-Presbyterian’s imaging and surgical suite provides first-of-its-kind clinical care

Recently celebrating one year in operation, the NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch Center is a world-class ambulatory care facility that combines cutting-edge technology with innovative clinical approaches to ensure a seamless patient experience from diagnosis to treatment.  The MRI/PET/Angiography Suite, which includes a first-of-its-kind procedure room integrating scanning and surgical procedures, is a prime example of the ideas and innovations that are central to the building’s design.

The suite combines key imaging technologies used for minimally-invasive procedures, including MRI/PET, fluoroscopy, ultrasound and rotational CT, with a fixed Angio C-arm in an operating room setting.  A flexible central table design provides access to all of these technologies in a single room. In addition, procedure verification occurs through real-time advanced imaging registration technology, streamlining treatment and reducing the need for multiple patient visits.

“We are proud to have collaborated with NewYork-Presbyterian to create this unique space,” says Ballinger Project Architect Shawn Billiard, RA.  “This co-location and arrangement of equipment allows clinicians to diagnose, plan, and precisely guide procedures all in one place, at one time.”

Ballinger, responsible for clinical planning and design within the NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch Center, utilized 3D-printed models of people, equipment and furniture to explore and rapidly assess possible room configurations in order to efficiently advance the suite’s design process with various NewYork-Presbyterian stakeholder groups. This highly-effective workshop style, used for clinical spaces throughout the hospital, helped clinicians quickly understand spatial and design issues and was critical to the room’s success.

room-animation

The NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch Center was designed in a collaboration between Ballinger, HOK, and Pei Cobb Freed & Partners.

Swarthmore’s Singer Hall Named in Honor of Scientist Alumna

Swarthmore College’s new biology, engineering and psychology building, currently under construction, will be named Maxine Frank Singer ’52 Hall, becoming one of the first science buildings named for a woman on an American college campus.

Swarthmore CollegeAfter graduating from Swarthmore in 1952, Maxine Frank Singer earned a PhD in biochemistry from Yale University and went on to make significant scientific breakthroughs, including helping to decipher the human genetic code. In addition to conducting research and serving as a science administrator, she helped formulate the National Institutes of Health’s guidelines about how research in genetic engineering should be carried out.

The naming in Singer’s honor was proposed by the family of Eugene Lang, who donated $50 million to the building project.

Ballinger led the planning, design and engineering for the 160,000 SF interdisciplinary hub, which will promote synergies between engineering and other academic disciplines. The building will include classrooms, laboratories, office space, and indoor and outdoor commons.

Link to details: Swarthmore College Maxine Frank Singer ’52 Hall

Ballinger presents at COAA Spring Leadership Conference

Ballinger Associate Principal Steve Wittry, AIA will present at the Construction Owners Association of America’s Spring Owners Leadership Conference on May 8, alongside Terry Cook,  Senior Associate VP for Administrative Services at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), John Zahor, Director of Operations + Maintenance at UMBC, and Charles KonKolics, Project Executive and Vice President at Whiting-Turner.

The presentation, “Quality: You Can’t Afford NOT to Do This” will focus on quality assurance and quality control best practices from project inception to completion. The presentation draws on lessons from UMBC’s new Interdisciplinary Life Sciences Building, scheduled to open this year.

 

Linode Headquarters to receive Grand Jury Award from Preservation Alliance

Philadelphia’s Preservation Alliance will recognize Ballinger’s recent renovation of the Corn Exchange National Bank Building at the Annual Preservation Achievement Awards on June 5th. Linode Headquarters was selected for a Grand Jury Award.  The Old City landmark, known for its neoclassical style and history as a former MTV Real World house, was built for the Union Bank of Philadelphia in 1902 and now serves as workspace for the growing cloud-hosting company Linode. The building is listed in Philadelphia’s registrar of historic places and considered significant within the National Old City Historic District.

The mission of the Preservation Alliance is to promote appreciation and appropriate use of the Philadelphia’s historic buildings, communities and landscapes. The annual Preservation Achievement Awards honor outstanding contributions to the preservation of the region’s architectural and cultural heritage. Linode’s founder and CEO, Chris Aker, and Ballinger’s Director of Historic Preservation, Fon S. Wang, AIA, LEED AP, will accept the award at a ceremony at Philadelphia’s Vie.

Katherine Ahrens named to Philadelphia Business Journal’s 40 under 40

Senior Associate Katherine Ahrens, LEED AP was recognized as one of Philadelphia’s Business Journal’s “40 under 40.” The award celebrates current and future leaders in various industries across the Greater Philadelphia area. As a senior workplace strategist and studio leader of Ballinger’s interiors group, Katherine brings a unique approach to understanding clients’ cultural and strategic needs. In addition to improving clients’ workspaces, she has actively championed rigor and data-sharing across the practice, and is cofounder of Ballinger’s Research and Strategy group.

An awards ceremony recognizing all 40 awardees will be held at Philadelphia’s SugarHouse Casino Event Center on May 30.

Louis Meilink Elevated to AIA College of Fellows

Ballinger principal Louis A. Meilink, Jr. was elevated to the prestigious College of Fellows of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), an honor awarded to members who have made significant contributions to the profession of architecture.

Since joining the firm in 1987, Lou’s design solutions have helped shape the future of healthcare. He led the design of significant buildings for NewYork-Presbyterian, Weill Cornell Medical College, Tower Health System, the University of Maryland Medical Center, the University of Rochester Medical Center, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, NYU Langone Health, Penn Medicine Lancaster General Health and Penn Medicine Chester County Hospital, among others. Lou is an author, speaker and active member of the AIA Academy of Architecture for Health.

Lou was nominated by Ballinger’s Terry D. Steelman, FAIA who described Lou as “a talented architect with a unique ability to balance the programmatic, budget and schedule demands of the healthcare client while aspiring to create noteworthy buildings with innovative healing environments. Consequently, he has become a trusted advisor to some of the nation’s top academic medical center leaders.”

Ballinger colleague William R. Gustafson, FAIA served as Lou’s sponsor. “I have been working with Lou for his entire 31-year career at Ballinger, and have watched him balance firm leadership, project responsibilities, and knowledge-sharing, all with humility and grace,” Gustafson said.

The Fellowship program recognizes architects who have achieved a standard of excellence in the profession and made a significant contribution to architecture and society on a national level. Fellows are selected by a seven-member jury of peers. Stringent requirements result in only three percent of the AIA’s more than 91,000 members being recognized as fellows, among them current Ballinger principals William R. Gustafson, FAIA and Terry D. Steelman, FAIA.

Fellows will be honored at a ceremony on June 7, 2019 at the AIA Conference on Architecture in Las Vegas.

Bryn Mawr Hospital Celebrates Opening of New Patient Pavilion

Bryn Mawr Hospital, part of Main Line Health, celebrated the opening of a new 256,400 SF eight-floor patient pavilion. Ballinger provided MEP and fire protection engineering services for the transformative modernization. The engineering team was tasked with prioritizing patient safety in the event of an emergency, while also reducing energy use.

The new power system for the campus has 100% emergency backup via onsite generators. This enables the hospital to operate in “island mode,” meaning hospital operations can continue without service interruption, even in the event that the hospital is isolated from the local electricity distribution network.

The pavilion is designed to meet LEED Silver requirements, as outlined by the United States Green Building Council (USGBC). The new operating room (OR) platform employs a Dedicated Outside Air System (DOAS) with active desiccant dehumidification and individual air handlers for each OR space.  This system allows each OR to be individually set to a temperature between 60 and 80 degrees and maintain humidity between 30% RH and 50% RH without using reheat energy. Individual temperature and humidity controls increase staff and patient comfort and contribute to reducing energy costs. Ballinger also designed an upgraded 5,200 ton chiller plant and a high-rise fire sprinkler system that includes pioneering technology to avoid requiring pressure-reducing valves throughout the system, saving long term ownership costs. Other sustainable features include LED lighting controls and green roofs.

Ballinger on Executive Leaders Radio

Ballinger principal Craig S. Spangler, AIA was interviewed on Executive Leaders Radio, a program on Biz Talk Radio that aired November 16. Each show includes interviews with four prominent business leaders in an informal, conversational format. Guests included Kareem Thomas, Chief Financial Officer of American Reading Company, Bruce Foulke, CEO and President of American Heritage Federal Credit Union, and Mathieu J. Shapiro, Managing Partner of Obermayer Rebmann Maxwell & Hippel LLP.

Craig discussed his path to architecture and the influences that his family had on his career trajectory. He reflected on his evolution from a technical focus to a creative profession, and on his current role in the practice.

Listen to the full show

Ballinger’s Michael Radio leads formation of scholarship fund

As current president of the Philadelphia chapter of ASHRAE, Ballinger senior associate Michael Radio, PE, CEM, BEMP, LEED AP led the formation of a scholarship fund intended to encourage female college students to pursue studies in engineering. The ASHRAE Philadelphia Debra H. Kennoy Scholarship Fund will be awarded to a full time student in the Philadelphia area interested in a profession in the heating, refrigerating and air conditioning industry. “Debra’s work in the refrigeration market was transformational in fighting global warming.  We are honored that ASHRAE Philadelphia can help fulfill her desire to promote engineering careers among women,” said Michael.

ASHRAE, the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, is a global society advancing human well-being through sustainable technology for the built environment. Members focus on building systems, energy efficiency, indoor air quality, refrigeration and sustainability within the industry. Several Ballinger staff members serve on the board of governors and ASHRAE Philadelphia committees.

Ballinger Named to Distinguished ARCHITECT 50

Each year, ARCHITECT magazine conducts an in-depth survey to produce a qualitative ranking of the top 50 architecture firms, focusing on the categories of business, sustainability and design. Based on a portfolio of built and unbuilt work and factors such as revenue, employee benefits and energy efficiency metrics, Ballinger was ranked #43 overall. Ballinger’s commitment to energy-efficient design was recognized with a rank of 36 in the sustainability category.
Link to full survey results

Ballinger revives historic landmark for Linode’s new Philadelphia offices

Ballinger recently completed the renovation of the Corn Exchange National Bank building for the growing cloud-hosting company Linode. The new headquarters is a mashup of Silicon Valley technology and historic Philadelphia architecture. Sited next to the Betsy Ross House and along N3rd Street, the city’s official tech corridor, the building offers the kind of workspace that appeals to tech workers: it’s open, authentic, transparent, and home to state-of-the-art computing.

The Old City landmark, known for its neoclassical style and history as a former MTV Real World house, was built for the Union Bank of Philadelphia in 1902. It is listed in Philadelphia’s register of historic places and considered significant within the National Old City Historic District, with a facade featuring colossal limestone columns and a granite stoop with wood, bronze, and glass sliding-pocket doors. Its urban location promises to jumpstart Linode’s ability to recruit and retain highly-qualified employees.

Ballinger Principal, Keith C.H. Mock, AIA, and Director of Historic Preservation and Adaptive Reuse, Fon Wang, AIA, LEED AP, were tasked with rehabilitating the structure’s many striking original features while creating modern and functional offices for engineers, product development, sales, marketing, and customer support. Philadelphia specialists Materials Conservation Co. refurbished original wood lacquer, handmade plaster tiles and balustrade, hand-painting them to blend with the original. Masons uncovered brick walls and removed builder-grade floor tiles to showcase the original marble flooring. The team also rescued and rehabilitated the building’s 100-year-old wooden windows. Wang was energized by Linode’s commitment to restoring the building: “It was an honor working with an owner who fosters a true love for the building and its history. A lot of details that could have fallen to the wayside were saved and reinvigorated.”

The main bank room was designed to become a tech hub for social engagement. The underground bank vault, at one point the infamous Real World “confessional,” is now a break-out room, accessed through the original, restored metal vault door. Ballinger worked with state and city officials throughout the project to ensure that all work followed building regulations, and preservation and accessibility guidelines— a task that was challenged by the building’s age and landmark status. The result is a sophisticated design that highlights historic features and renders the building systems practically invisible.

Ballinger successfully assisted Linode in the approval of Federal Historic Preservation Tax credits, completing Parts I through III of the application and working with the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission (PMHC) and the Philadelphia Historical Commission. The tax credit allows Linode to apply 20% of the renovation cost, including construction and soft costs, to their tax liability.

The building officially opened in June 2018 and has been well received by “Linodians.” Summarizing her passion for the project, Wang said, “One of the principles of historic preservation is continued use. My hope is that this adaptive reuse serves as a precedent to other buildings in need of a new life.”

Ballinger at CMAA National Conference

Ballinger Associate Josh Abbell, AIA LEED AP BD+C presented at the Construction Management Association of America (CMAA) National Conference in Las Vegas. The session, “Integrated Project Team Delivery: The Boeing H47 Focused Factory Transformation,” was a project case study highlighting the close collaboration between the owner, architect/engineer and construction manager in delivering a complex multi-phase renovation project under tight schedule constraints within an active factory. Josh also highlighted the process and challenges involved in the successful pursuit of LEED Certification for the factory and campus transformation project, which encompassed multiple construction projects. Josh was joined by Christian W. Calhoun, PE, Facilities Site and Equipment Services Manager at The Boeing Company, and Andrew H. Munter, CCM-PM, Senior Associate at STV Construction.

Ballinger provided master planning, architecture and engineering services for the 220,000 SF integrated factory and office space project in Ridley Park, Pennsylvania.

Design for Penn’s “Evans Building Centennial Renaissance” Achieves LEED Gold

In May 2018, the University of Pennsylvania’s recently renovated Evans Building was awarded LEED Gold by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). The building is home to Penn’s School of Dental Medicine and the Leon Levy Dental Medicine Library.

Anticipating the structure’s 100th anniversary in 2015, Penn commissioned Ballinger to program, plan, and redesign the historic building for their “Evans Building Centennial Renaissance” initiative. With the goal of bringing the School of Dental Medicine into the 21st century, the space was re-envisioned to optimize patient care, expand academic and clinical spaces, and improve circulation flows.

Ballinger’s designers, engineers, and historic preservation team were tasked with preserving the building’s historic character while also modernizing infrastructure and systems to improve occupant comfort and operating efficiencies. USGBC awarded the LEED Gold certification based on the building’s optimized energy performance, green power, enhanced commissioning, reduced water usage, and innovative design.

The State of Population Health in the U.S.

On display at this year’s European Healthcare Design Congress & Exhibition, Ballinger presented an infographic poster analyzing the current state of population health in the United States and a case study of the Ballinger-designed 88,000 SF green roof at Tower Health System as a solution to space limitations and strategy to improve the patient experience.

Population Health Poster

Beyond Green Poster

 

Telemedicine and the Future of Disruption

Well-trained and effective clinical staff are in high demand around the world. In the United States, primary care physicians are out-numbered 3:1 by specialists, leaving the neediest populations in remote areas without physicians to address chronic and primary care.  Staff at large institutions are increasingly asked to see patients in multiple locations across a number of campuses, stretching their time and resources.

Telemedicine presents an unprecedented opportunity to extend the reach of existing staff into rural and remote locations and prolong the careers of experienced nurses and physicians by reducing the physical demands of providing care. In their presentation to the European Healthcare Design Congress & Exhibition on June 11, “Telemedicine and the Future of Disruption”, Ballinger Principal Louis A. Meilink Jr., AIA, ACHA, ACHE and Senior Project Healthcare Planner, Christina Grimes, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, EDAC explored the increasing implementation of telehealth technologies and ways in which space planning can evolve to support these changes.

The topic was in keeping with the theme of the 4th annual conference, “Utopia or dystopia? Visioning the future for health” focused on the effects of environmental changes and technological advancement on modern healthcare systems and how institutions and designers can adjust to take advantage of advances such as AI, remote and algorithmic diagnosis, nanotechnology, and virtual reality. Held in London, this year’s event was organized by Architects for Health and SALUS Global Knowledge Exchange and hosted by the Royal College of Physicians.

Link to presentation

Cooper University Health Care MD Anderson Cancer Center Oncology In-Patient Unit Wins IIDA Award

Ballinger’s design of the MD Anderson Cancer Center Oncology In-Patient Unit at Cooper University Health Care received a Design Award in the Healthcare (under 30,000 SF) category from the International Interior Design Association (IIDA) PA|NJ|DE Chapter. The unit is designed to offer a clean, contemporary, calming and spacious feeling to patients, staff and families. Environmental graphics, illustrating flowers native to New Jersey, add touches of serene beauty to the space.

The annual Interior Design Awards competition recognizes outstanding interior environments designed by IIDA members in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware. The award ceremony, held at Philadelphia’s Franklin Institute, included a presentation and exhibit of project entries.

Fostering Innovation While Promoting a Nomadic Workforce

Nomadic workers are mobile across buildings, campuses, and the globe. As the primary workplace evolves, how can the design of work spaces foster innovation and support these changes in the workforce? Ballinger principal Keith Mock, AIA, senior associate Christina Grimes, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, and associate Katherine Lyons presented their findings at the Tradeline University Facilities 2018 Conference in Austin. Their talk demonstrated how to incorporate individual work styles and cultural attributes into efficient, holistic team environments. By examining the nomadic journey of a typical researcher across multiple work environments, they identified work space design improvements.

NewYork-Presbyterian Opens a World-Class Center for Ambulatory Care

A Seamless Patient Experience, Designed to Reduce Stress and Anxiety, Keeps the Focus on Healing

On April 24, 2018, NewYork-Presbyterian (NYP) celebrated the opening of the David H. Koch Center, a world-class ambulatory care center that combines innovative clinical approaches and cutting-edge technology to provide exceptional care and a seamless patient experience.

The design is a collaboration among Ballinger as Medical Architect, HOK as Architect, and Pei Cobb Freed & Partners as Consulting Architect for building envelope and lobby.

The approximately 740,000-sq.-ft. facility, located at the NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center campus on York Avenue and 68th Street, is home to a wide range of ambulatory care services, including outpatient surgery, interventional radiology, diagnostic imaging and infusion services, as well as an Integrative Health and Wellbeing program that will open in June.

“Our goal in creating the NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch Center was to develop a new vision for what ambulatory care could be by focusing first and foremost on patients’ needs and the delivery of exceptional care,” said Dr. Steven J. Corwin, president and CEO of NewYork-Presbyterian. “Every decision about the design and operation of this building was made with the patient in mind, from the quick and easy check-in to the private prep and recovery rooms, light-filled treatment areas and real-time status updates. This is truly an environment that was designed for healing, and we believe it represents the future of ambulatory care.”

For patients, the NYP David H. Koch Center will serve as a one-stop destination for individualized, coordinated care from diagnosis to treatment. Multidisciplinary teams of physicians from Weill Cornell Medicine, working collaboratively under one roof, will consider each patient holistically, whether they are being treated for digestive diseases, cancer or other conditions, or coming for outpatient surgery, interventional radiology or diagnostic imaging.

Smart technology and smart spaces are central to the design and function of the building to make patient visits as smooth and pleasant as possible. For example, patients can complete their paperwork remotely and securely before their visit, on their mobile phone or online. Upon arrival, they will be offered a personalized “smartband” that provides access to the building and receive information about their visit and step-by-step directions to their room through the NYP app. Each patient’s visit has a clear, planned flow that begins and ends in the same space for patients having a procedure — a private prep and recovery room that serves as “home base” for them and their companions throughout their visit.

Technology is central to delivering exceptional, cutting-edge care. A prime example is the NYP David H. Koch Center’s MRI/PET/Angiography suite, the first of its kind in the world. Combining all of the key imaging technologies used for minimally-invasive procedures, including MRI/PET, fluoroscopy, ultrasound, and rotational CT, it enables clinicians to diagnose, plan, and precisely guide procedures and verify their completeness. The NYP David H. Koch Center features three linear accelerators, including New York’s first MRI-guided linear accelerator for precision radiation treatment of tumors.

Additional clinical features include:

  • 12 operating suites, 6 interventional radiology procedure rooms, and 11 endoscopic procedure rooms, including an operating room dedicated to breast surgery with mammography and ultrasound equipment.
  • Decentralized clinical care with stations directly outside private patient rooms, offering patients easier access to their care team.
  • Radiation oncology services located on the light-filled 4th floor, thanks to the building’s unique engineering. Unlike many institutions, there are no basement treatment areas here.
  • Easy access to discharge instructions, test results and video follow-up appointments with physicians through the NYP app.

Sustainability and Resiliency
The NYP David H. Koch Center is designed to be highly sustainable, from its green roof, which can detain up to six inches of storm water, to its high-performance building envelope. The distinctive “skin” consists of triple-paned insulated glazing with a slatted wood screen, which significantly reduces solar glare, building heat gain, and the need for solar and privacy shading.

The building is also resilient in the case of an extreme weather event or disruption to city power, with heating equipment, air handling units, emergency generators and other key operational equipment located on higher floors above potential flood levels.

Enhanced Care for Patients
The design features a soothing palette of materials including wood and stone. A typical procedure floor has a sky lobby, 12 flexible procedure rooms, and 36 private prep and recovery rooms. Procedure preparation and recovery occur in the same dedicated room, which helps minimize patient movements and provides peace of mind for the patient, family, and care team.

Circulation is clear, with a separation of “on-stage” and “off-stage” flows so patients and families can travel along the light-filled perimeter corridors with clear wayfinding, and staff can move efficiently throughout the building, minimizing disruption to guests.

Infusion and radiation oncology areas – typically located on lower levels – are co-located on the 4th floor of the building. This allows patients and staff access to natural light, an example of the extraordinary accommodations made at the NYP David H. Koch Center to prioritize patient-centered care. The infusion area features a variety of treatment environments ranging from private rooms to warm and inviting community spaces.

NewYork-Presbyterian Alexandra Cohen Hospital for Women and Newborns
Beginning in 2020, the top five-and-a-half floors of the building will become home to the NewYork-Presbyterian Alexandra Cohen Hospital for Women and Newborns, the first of its kind in the tri-state area, offering compassionate, personalized care to pregnant women, newborn babies and their families. The 220,000-square-foot hospital within a hospital will feature 75 private rooms, 16 labor and delivery rooms, five cesarean section operative suites, 20 maternal critical assessment and treatment unit rooms and 15 ultrasound rooms, which will offer state-of-the-art visualization. The neonatal intensive care unit features 60 positions in private rooms, and is set to be the first facility in New York City to have MRI capabilities and an operating room in its neonatal intensive care unit.

 Team
NewYork-Presbyterian David H. Koch Center
Medical Architect: Ballinger
Architect: HOK
Consulting Architect (building envelope and lobby): Pei Cobb Freed & Partners
Interior Design: Ballinger and HOK
Structural Engineer: Thornton Tomasetti
MEP: Syska Hennesy Group
Construction Manager: Turner Construction Company
Lobby Art: Paqutá (2018) by Beatriz Milhazes

Beyond Green: Design of the Built Environment and Its Impact on Healthy Communities

On March 19, at this year’s Population Health Colloquium in Philadelphia, Ballinger Associate Principal, Erin Cooper, AIA, LEED AP and Senior Project Healthcare Planner, Christina Grimes, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, EDAC presented their talk entitled “Beyond Green: Design of the Built Environment and Its Impact on Healthy Communities”. Their session explored the significance of design in improving overall wellness for communities and patient care spaces. They illustrated the role design can play within population health using examples from recent Ballinger projects, Penn Medicine, Lancaster General Health, Ann B. Barshinger Cancer Institute; Tower Health, Reading HealthPlex for Advanced Surgical and Patient Care; and Rutgers University, New Jersey Institute for Food, Nutrition + Health.

The annual Population Health Colloquium brings together healthcare providers, payers, pharmaceutical executives, leading technology and solutions companies, academia, and government to highlight advances in population health. The conference is an opportunity for leaders within the industry to share best practices, case studies, expert insights, and industry trends.

Link to slides 

Ballinger Senior Principals Craig Spangler and Terry Steelman Present at Tradeline

The “Engineer of the Future” must be creative, entrepreneurial, and adaptable. Engineering is increasingly focused on application of scientific discoveries to solve real-world issues, a dynamic that requires a “next generation” of engineering facilities capable of supporting these interdisciplinary convergent trends.

Ballinger Senior Principals Craig S. Spangler, AIA and Terry D. Steelman, FAIA explored this topic at the 2017 Tradeline Conference on College and University Science and Engineering Facilities. Their talk, titled “Next Generation Engineering Facilities: Features That Support a New Skill Set for the ‘Engineer of the Future,’” described how new models for teaching and research facilities can support future engineers.

The presentation featured case studies of Ballinger’s work on the campuses of the University of Rhode Island, George Washington University and the University of Maryland.

Ballinger Presents at Tradeline Space Strategies 2017

Ballinger’s Terry D. Steelman, FAIA, LEED AP and Katherine Ahrens, LEED AP, along with Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Senior Vice President Doug E. Carney, AIA, LEED AP, gave a presentation at the 2017 Tradeline Conference on Space Strategies. Their talk “A Workplace Innovation Process to Harness the How, When, What and Why of Your Organization’s Working Style,” explored how Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) approached the launch of a more progressive work environment.

Ballinger Presents at 2017 International Institute for Sustainable Labs Conference

Ballinger Principals Craig S. Spangler, AIA and Jonathan Friedan, PE, LEED AP presented at this year’s International Institute for Sustainable Labs Conference in Boston, MA. The I2SL annual conference is a technical forum focused on strategies to meet the challenges of energy efficiency and environmental sustainability in laboratories and related facilities.

Their presentation, “Share the Air: Cascading Air Strategies Using Neutral Temperature Dedicated Outdoor Air Systems” explores how cascading air strategies can be applied to the design of complex buildings to optimize energy savings from first costs to continued maintenance.

Illustrated with examples from Ballinger’s portfolio, the presentation highlighted successful design and engineering strategies to minimize energy use and reduce costs through the use of neutral temperature dedicated outdoor air systems.

 

Link to slides

Healthcare Facilities Management Covers Engagement Process at Tower Health System

Ballinger Senior Project Architect Robert P. Goss, Jr., AIA was interviewed for two pieces in the August issue of Healthcare Facilities Management. The article “Six steps for planning low-voltage systems” outlines a process for planning the advanced technology integration now required in hospital design.  Drawing on his experience working on the Reading Healthplex for Advanced Surgical and Patient Care, Rob describes Ballinger’s user engagement process.

The sidebar article “User input and planning informs high-tech facility” dives deeper into the Reading HealthPlex process, highlighting the 60 user group meetings Ballinger conducted as part of the planning phase. 

Read the articles here and here.

Post-Occupancy Evaluation Published for Penn Medicine Lancaster General Health’s Ann B. Barshinger Cancer Institute

Ballinger recently published a Post-Occupancy Evaluation (POE) of the Ann B. Barshinger Cancer Institute at Penn Medicine’s Lancaster General Health. Ballinger conducts POE’s to assess and monitor how buildings are being used. This data informs how future designs can best foster healing and optimize the healthcare experience for patients, families, and caregivers. The research team was led by Ballinger Principal, Louis A. Meilink, Jr., AIA, ACHA, ACHE; Senior Associate, Amy Floresta, AIA, LEED AP; and Healthcare Planner, Christina Grimes, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, EDAC.

The objective of the POE was to understand which planning and design intentions have been most successfully realized, where user adaptations have been made, and the reasons for change. The team began by gathering both qualitative and quantitative data through an on-line survey to patients and staff, on-site interviews with staff, and on-site observation. These varied collection points allowed the evaluation team to triangulate issues that permeate all groups. The data was then evaluated using three categories: the overall building design and the perception of its spaces, how shifts in operations and procedure have affected staff culture, and patient experience.

The results suggest that the design was successful in fulfilling Lancaster General Health’s vision of providing an extraordinary experience every time. The iconic and integrated nature of the building has increased the hospital’s ability to attract and retain talented physicians and caregivers. Patients reported spending a significant amount of time utilizing the building amenities, which can be attributed, in part, to the presence of nature throughout these areas. The clinical layout was designed to provide a quiet and calming atmosphere. By separating the “on-stage” clinical environment from “off-stage” staff circulation, noise, traffic, and disruption were reduced. Decentralization supply stations reduced walking distances for staff and increased their time with patients. Overall, respondents found these planning strategies effective in improving the healthcare experience.

View the post-occupancy evaluation

Post-Occupancy Evaluation Published for Penn Medicine Chester County Hospital’s Lasko Tower

As part of Ballinger’s commitment to designing facilities that optimize the healthcare experience for patients, families and staff, our teams conduct post-occupancy evaluations (POE) on completed projects to assess and monitor how the buildings are being used. Ballinger recently published a POE on their design for the Lasko Tower at Penn Medicine Chester County Hospital, completed in 2015. The research team, led by Ballinger Principal Louis A. Meilink, Jr., AIA, ACHA, ACHE and healthcare planners Christina Grimes, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, EDAC and Debbie Phillips, AIA, ACHA, EDAC, assessed which planning and design interventions were most successful and what effect the unit design had on staff and patients.

Although the primary goal was to gather insights for an additional bed tower (currently under construction), it also offered an opportunity to compare patient satisfaction and operational performance against an existing 20-bed unit, the West Building (built in 1962 and renovated in 1998). Significant differences between the West unit and the Lasko Tower unit include a larger floor area with a racetrack organization of patient beds rather than a single-corridor layout, the inclusion of decentralized care stations between every two patient rooms, and more locations for staff charting.

The analysis assessed patient satisfaction with rooms and amenities, staff operations relative to charting and patient care, and housekeeping operations relative to material selection and ongoing maintenance. Because both of the units studied have private patient rooms, the evaluation enabled direct comparison between fall rates, HCAHPS scores (noise and cleanliness), and rates of hospital acquired infections (HAI). The study included a proximity index charting the travel distances between staff care stations, patient rooms and supplies, and assigned a cost/benefit metric to key design considerations.

The POE results suggest Lasko Tower is an improved patient care environment, and since moving in, the hospital has noted significant improvements in all categories. The insights gained through this study directly informed planning of the 96-room patient bed tower currently under construction.

View the post-occupancy evaluation

Evaluating the Benefits of Decentralized Stations Beyond Patient Visibility

Ballinger recently conducted a post-occupancy evaluation to assess how effective the inclusion of decentralized caregiver stations are toward improving staff and patient experience in the medical/surgical inpatient environment.

The research team focused on the Ballinger-designed Lasko Tower at Penn Medicine Chester County Hospital that was completed in 2015 and utilized data and survey results to compare the new floors, each featuring decentralized caregiver stations to existing units which previously accommodated the same patient populations and were built with a single caregiver station and no decentralized stations.  By controlling for patient populations and consistent staff, the study focused on the physical environment. Its results support a strong case for the use of decentralized stations with benefits extending beyond patient visibility.

This research was published by the AIA AAH Academy Journal in an article written by Ballinger principal Louis A. Meilink, Jr. AIA, ACHA, ACHE and senior associate Christina Grimes, AIA, LEED BD+C, EDAC entitled “The decentralized station: More than just patient visibility”.

Link to Article

Johns Hopkins University Undergraduate Teaching Labs Achieves LEED Platinum

We are pleased to announce that Johns Hopkins University’s Undergraduate Teaching Laboratory (UTL) was recently awarded LEED Platinum by the United States Green Building Council (USCBC). Platinum is USGBC’s highest level of LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification, which serves as the foremost standard in sustainable building and design.

Ballinger provided architecture, programming, planning, and engineering services in the development of this light-filled learning and research facility that supports Johns Hopkins University’s biology, chemistry, neuroscience, and biophysics departments. The design addressed a 2009 JHU President’s Task Force on Climate Change Report, which called for an aggressive 51% reduction in carbon emissions.

A multitude of sustainability features were woven into the building’s framework. Ballinger’s design placed emphasis on energy efficiency, sustainable site development, and interior environmental quality. The facility is designed to use 50% less energy than similar lab buildings, by employing decoupled neutral air systems, chilled beams, occupancy sensors, high-performance fume hoods, and dual energy wheels that recover heat and moisture from exhaust air.  As a result, the project has been recognized with sustainability awards as well as design awards.

As an integrated architecture and engineering firm, Ballinger is proud to be recognized as a leader in sustainable design. This month, Ballinger Associate Principal Brad Crowley will accept a 1st place Technology Award from the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers at the Annual ASHRAE Winter Conference for the advanced energy-efficient solutions utilized in this building.